Eleanor Beardsley Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy.
Eleanor Beardsley
NPR

Eleanor Beardsley

Correspondent, Paris

Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy. Since then, she has steadily worked her way to becoming an integral part of the NPR Europe reporting team.

Beardsley has been an active part of NPR's coverage of the two waves of terrorist attacks in Paris and in Brussels. She has also followed the migrant crisis, traveling to meet and report on arriving refugees in Hungary, Austria, Germany, Sweden, and France. She has also travelled to Ukraine, including the flashpoint eastern city of Donetsk, to report on the war there, and to Athens, to follow the Greek debt crisis.

In 2011 Beardsley covered the first Arab Spring revolution in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Since then she has returned to the North African country many times to follow its progress on the road to democracy.

In France, Beardsley covered both 2007 and 2012 French presidential elections. She also reported on the riots in French suburbs in 2005 and the massive student demonstrations in 2006. Beardsley has followed the Tour de France cycling race and been back to her old stomping ground — Kosovo — to report for NPR on three separate occasions.

Prior to moving to Paris, Beardsley worked for three years with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. She also worked as a television producer for French broadcaster TF1 in Washington, DC and as a staff assistant to Senator Strom Thurmond.

Reporting from France for Beardsley is the fulfillment of a lifelong passion for the French language and culture. At the age of 10 she began learning French by reading the Asterix The Gaul comic book series with her father.

While she came to the field of radio journalism relatively late in her career, Beardsley says her varied background, studies, and travels prepared her for the job as well as any journalism school. "I love reporting on the French because there are so many stereotypes about them that exist in America," she says. "Sometimes it's fun to dispel the false notions and show a different side of the Gallic character. And sometimes the old stereotypes do hold up. But whether Americans love or hate France and the French, they're always interested!"

A native of South Carolina, Beardsley has a Bachelor of Arts in European history and French from Furman University in Greenville, S.C., and a master's degree in International Business from the University of South Carolina.

Beardsley is interested in politics, travel, and observing foreign cultures. Her favorite cities are Paris and Istanbul.

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Story Archive

First State Visit: Trump Hosts French President Emmanuel Macron

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How A Teacher In France Is Trying To Help His Students Spot Fake News

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Murder Of Elderly Jewish French Woman Triggers Demonstrations

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European Commission Outlines Plan To Change How Internet Companies Are Taxed

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Gunman Killed By Police After Killing 3, Injuring 16 In Southern France

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Patrick Desbois began investigating Nazi crimes because of his family history. His grandfather was deported to a work camp in Ukraine during World War II but never spoke about what had happened. "So I decided to go there one day," he says, "and that's when I discovered that the Germans shot at a minimum 18,000 Jews, plus gypsies, plus Soviet prisoners. But no one wanted to speak about it." Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Documenting Nazi Crimes, A French Priest Exposes ISIS Attacks On Yazidis

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French Fashion Designer Givenchy Dies At 91

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Bannon Backs Le Pen With A Shared Anti-Establishment Stance

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Meet The French Priest Documenting Crimes Committed By ISIS Against Yazidis

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France Proposes Fines For Catcalling

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Djerbrani checks food donations from a French grocery store before driving it across town to a church, which will distribute it to poor families. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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French Food Waste Law Changing How Grocery Stores Approach Excess Food

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Standingwith French Culture Minister Françoise Nyssen, Christopher Bromberg and Henrietta Schubert, grandchildren of Henry and Hertha Bromberg, view Flemish painter Joachim Patinir's Triptych of the Crucifixion, which was returned to them Monday by the French state. Didier Plowy/Ministère de la Culture hide caption

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France Hopes Exhibit Of Nazi-Stolen Art Can Aid Stalled Search For Owners

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