Eleanor Beardsley Eleanor Beardsley is an NPR correspondent based in Paris, France.
Eleanor Beardsley
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Eleanor Beardsley

Eleanor Beardsley
NPR

Eleanor Beardsley

Correspondent, Paris

Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture and gastronomy. Since then, she has steadily worked her way to becoming an integral part of the NPR Europe reporting team.

Beardsley has been an active part of NPR's coverage of terrorist attacks in Paris and in Brussels. She has also followed the migrant crisis, traveling to meet and report on arriving refugees in Hungary, Austria, Germany, Sweden and France. She has also traveled to Ukraine, including the flashpoint eastern city of Donetsk, to report on the war there, and to Athens, to follow the Greek debt crisis.

In 2011, Beardsley covered the first Arab Spring revolution in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Since then she has returned to the North African country many times.

In France, Beardsley has covered three presidential elections, including the surprising win by outsider Emmanuel Macron in 2017. Less than two years later, Macron's presidency was severely tested by France's Yellow vest movement, which Beardsley followed closely.

Beardsley especially enjoys historical topics and has covered several anniversaries of the Normandy D-day invasion as well as the centennial of World War I.

In sports, Beardsley closely covered the Women's World Soccer Cup held in France in June 2019 (and won by Team USA!) and regularly follows the Tour de France cycling race.

Prior to moving to Paris, Beardsley worked for three years with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. She also worked as a television news producer for French broadcaster TF1 in Washington, D.C., and as a staff assistant to South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond.

Reporting from France for Beardsley is the fulfillment of a lifelong passion for the French language and culture. At the age of 10 she began learning French by reading the Asterix the Gaul comic book series with her father.

While she came to the field of radio journalism relatively late in her career, Beardsley says her varied background, studies and travels prepared her for the job. "I love reporting on the French because there are so many stereotypes about them in America," she says. "Sometimes it's fun to dispel the false notions and show a different side of the Gallic character. And sometimes the old stereotypes do hold up. But whether Americans love or hate France and the French, they're always interested!"

A native of South Carolina, Beardsley has a Bachelor of Arts in European history and French from Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina, and a master's degree in International Business from the University of South Carolina.

Beardsley is interested in politics, travel and observing foreign cultures. Her favorite cities are Paris and Istanbul.

Story Archive

Ukraine's rail system is working overtime to keep people and goods moving

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A 'monster' wildfire in France sends thousands out of their homes

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Oleg Repnoy stands in front of his Evacuation 200 vehicle. "My job is to accompany these heroes on their last trip home," he says. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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These Ukrainian volunteers recover soldiers' bodies to return them to their families

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Inside the workshop and showroom of Giovanna Alessandro, in Chernivtsi, Ukraine. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Ukraine's wedding dress industry is alive and well, despite the war

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The story of a war, a wedding dress and a business opportunity

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A man must decide to flee Ukraine to join his family or stay to care for his parents

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The European heat wave is spreading northward, fueling wildfire and drought dangers

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Irina Garmash, a mother of four from the eastern Ukrainian city of Sloviansk, sits on an evacuation train that has stopped in the center-eastern city of Dnipro, on July 8. The train carries residents from the eastern Donbas region fleeing war during the Russian invasion. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Riding Ukraine's last train line out of Donbas with families fleeing for their lives

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, center, and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson walk in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine, in April . Johnson may have been shown the door in Britain, but he remains a popular figure in Ukraine, where he is admired for his support for the country's effort to repel the Russian invasion. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/via AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/via AP

Igor the clown puts on a show for the children at café Lito, or Summer cafe, in Chernivtsi's Taras Chevchenko Park. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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There's nowhere in Ukraine to hide from the war. This café tries to help people cope

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The Russian army appears close to taking the entire Donbas region

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A burkini (right) and a culotte swimmer (center) are on display in the Cherchez la Femme (Look for the Woman) exhibition in the Jewish Museum in Berlin, Germany, on March 30, 2017. Christophe Gateau/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Gateau/picture alliance via Getty Images

A French city approved burkinis in its pools. Then the backlash came

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Macron's party faces competition from the far left for control of French parliament

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