Gene Demby Gene Demby is the Co-host/Correspondent for NPR's Code Switch team.
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Gene Demby

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GD 2020
Jessica Chou/NPR

Gene Demby

Co-host/Correspondent, Code Switch

Gene Demby is the co-host and correspondent for NPR's Code Switch team.

Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post's BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics and media called PostBourgie, which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

Demby is an avid runner, mainly because he wants to stay alive long enough to finally see the Sixers and Eagles win championships in their respective sports. You can follow him on Twitter at @GeeDee215.

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Friends Jennifer Chudy, an assistant professor of political science at Wellesley College who studies white public opinion around race, and Hakeem Jefferson, an assistant professor at Stanford University, scoured public opinion data together in order to write an essay for the New York Times last May called: "Support for the Black Lives Matter Movement Surged Last Year: Did It Last?" Lisa Abitbol; Harrison Truong/NPR hide caption

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The Sum Of Our Parts

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Star Wars action figures are seen for sale at a Target store on September 4, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Former civil rights lawyer-activist Floyd McKissick, poses with an architect's rendering of Soultech I, the first permanent building that will be part of the future "Soul City," to be built in Warren County, N.C., June 20, 1974. Harold Valentine/AP hide caption

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People eye each other with suspicion while dealing with the fear of Coronavirus. LA Johnson hide caption

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The U.S. Has A History Of Linking Disease With Race And Ethnicity

(Encore episode.) The coronavirus is all over the headlines these days. Accompanying those headlines? Suspicion and harassment of Asians and Asian Americans. Our colleague Gene Demby, co-host of NPR's Code Switch podcast, explains that this is part of a longer history in the United States of camouflaging xenophobia and racism as public health and hygiene concerns. We hear from historian Erika Lee, author of "America For Americans: A History Of Xenophobia In The United States."

The U.S. Has A History Of Linking Disease With Race And Ethnicity

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Lonnie Bunch, the 14th Secretary of the Smithsonian Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Racism In Medicine Casts A Pall Over COVID-19 Vaccinations

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Rev. Baums takes COVID Vaccine administered by nurse Anita Joy at the Zion AME Syracuse. Cherilyn Beckles for NPR hide caption

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Code Switch: A Shot In The Dark

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Rev. Baums takes COVID Vaccine administered by nurse Anita Joy at the Zion AME Syracuse. Cherilyn Beckles for NPR hide caption

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An ICU nurse helps a COVID-19 patient speak to their family over an iPad. Gabriella Angotti-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Hagner, John Early, Alia Shawkat and John Reynolds star in Search Party. Mark Schafer/Warner Media hide caption

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