Gene Demby Gene Demby is the Co-host/Correspondent for NPR's Code Switch team.
GD 2020
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Gene Demby

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GD 2020
Jessica Chou/NPR

Gene Demby

Co-host/Correspondent, Code Switch

Gene Demby is a founding member of NPRs Code Switch team, where he serves as a host of the show's podcast. In 2020, Code Switch was named Apple's inaugural Podcast Of The Year. Demby's essays for Code Switch have also earned him honors for commentary from the Online News Association. Prior to joining NPR, he served as the managing editor of HuffPost's BlackVoices. He began his professional journalism career at the New York Times, where he served in various roles.

Demby hails from Philadelphia and currently resides in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Jackie Lay for NPR

Wednesday

Despite being addictive and deadly, menthol cigarettes were long advertised as a healthy alternative to "regular" cigarettes — and heavily advertised to Black folks in cities. Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Lay/NPR

Wednesday

In 1937, the Washington Afro-American featured the "Lonesome Hearts" column, where Black folks looking for love could send letters. Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Wednesday

Taylor Swift, who has been celebrated for her ability to channel the emotions and perspectives of adolescent girls. Photos: Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP, Shirlaine Forrest/Getty Images for TAS/Design: Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Photos: Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP, Shirlaine Forrest/Getty Images for TAS/Design: Jackie Lay/NPR

Wednesday

NPR

Wednesday

Author Hajar Yazdiha (left) wrote about Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy in her book, The Struggle for the People's King (right). PR Agency hide caption

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PR Agency

Wednesday

Code Switch is live on stage in Little Rock, Ark. (right). They interviewed Dr. Sybil Jordan Hampton (left) about what it was like to go to school during desegregation efforts in the 1950s and 60s. Dr. Sibyl Jordan Hampton, Little Rock Public Radio hide caption

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Dr. Sibyl Jordan Hampton, Little Rock Public Radio

Wednesday

Clockwise from upper left: B.A.Parker at Somerset Place plantation as a child; Bad Bunny exalts Puerto Rico in his music of resistance; Chefs Reem Assil and Priya Krishna; Race is also a part of our taxes and who gets audited; Originally from Rwanda, Claude Gatebuke came to Nashville 30 years ago; Hank Azaria (left) and Hari Kondabolu speak since their fallout in 2017. B.A.Parker, Getty Images, NPR, Getty Images//LA Johnson/NPR, Joseph Ross for NPR, PR Agency hide caption

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B.A.Parker, Getty Images, NPR, Getty Images//LA Johnson/NPR, Joseph Ross for NPR, PR Agency

Thursday

Kaimana and Michael Fassbender in Next Goal Wins. Hilary Bronwyn Gayle/Searchlight Pictures hide caption

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Hilary Bronwyn Gayle/Searchlight Pictures

Wednesday

People rally during the "National March on Washington: Free Palestine" while calling for a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas, at Freedom Plaza November 4, 2023 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) hide caption

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(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Wednesday

Ada Limon, the current U.S. Poet Laureate, as well as a new recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship. Ayna Lorenzo hide caption

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Ayna Lorenzo

Giving up on identity with Ada Limón

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Wednesday

Comedian Hari Kondabolu with his son Arjun. Antoine Didienne/Courtesy of Hari Kondabolu hide caption

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Antoine Didienne/Courtesy of Hari Kondabolu

Wednesday

Author Vincent Schiraldi next to the cover of his new book, Mass Supervision. Headshot (left) by Paulette Louissaint hide caption

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Headshot (left) by Paulette Louissaint

Wednesday

Protesters for and against affirmative action demonstrate on Capitol Hill in June 2023. The Supreme Court ruled that race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina are unconstitutional. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The Supreme Court banned affirmative action — except at military service academies

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Wednesday

Originally from Rwanda, Claude Gatebuke came to Nashville 30 years ago. Joseph Ross for NPR hide caption

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Joseph Ross for NPR

Wednesday

NPR/Getty Images

Fall football — or the fall of football?

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Wednesday

Bad Bunny exalts Puerto Rico in his music of resistance. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Roy Johnson (right) with a Bishop Sycamore player in the HBO documentary, BS High. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Wednesday

Comedians Brian Bahe, Maz Jobrani and Aparna Nancherla. Brian Bahe, Storm Santos and Aparna Nancherla hide caption

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Brian Bahe, Storm Santos and Aparna Nancherla

Wednesday

Montgomery brawl doesn't constitute hate crime charges, police chief says

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Islen Milien for NPR

Wednesday

Thumy Phan for NPR

Wednesday

The conspiracy theory alleges that a shadowy global elite conspires to control the world's population, in part by forcing them to eat insects. Kyle Ellingson for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Ellingson for NPR

This right wing conspiracy theory about eating bugs is about as racist as you think

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Wednesday

LA Johnson/Getty Images/NPR

Black praise in white pews: When your church doesn't love you back

How do you participate in a faith practice that has a rough track record with racism? That's what our play-cousin J.C. Howard gets into on this week's episode of Code Switch. He talks to us about Black Christians who, like him for a time, found their spiritual homes in white evangelical churches.

Black praise in white pews: When your church doesn't love you back

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