Anastasia Tsioulcas Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter for NPR Music who produces and reports arts and music stories for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Anastasia Tsioulcas
Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Anastasia Tsioulcas

Reporter, NPR Music

Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter for NPR Music. She reports on a wide range of musical genres and music-industry topics for NPR's flagship news programs, as well as for NPR Music.

Tsioulcas is intensely interested in the arts at the intersection of culture, politics, economics and identity. She has profiled musicians and dancers in contemporary Cuba, a punk drummer from Washington, DC who raced to preserve the artistic traditions of pre-civil war Syria, a band of Muslim and Jewish musicians from Algeria reunited after 50 years, and an interfaith group from Texas rooted in a 700-year-old singing tradition from south Asia. She has also brought listeners into the creative process of musicians like composers Steve Reich and Terry Riley.

As a video producer, she has created some of NPR Music's high-profile music documentaries and performances, including bringing cellist Yo-Yo Ma to a Brooklyn theatrical props warehouse and pianist Yuja Wang to an icy-cold Steinway & Sons piano factory in Queens. Tsioulcas also produces some of the episodes in NPR Music's much-lauded Tiny Desk Concert series, and has hosted live concerts from venues like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge. She has also commissioned and produced several world premieres on behalf of NPR Music, including a live event that brought together 350 musicians on the steps of the Brooklyn Public Library.

Tsioulcas has reported from across Europe, north and west Africa, south Asia and Cuba for NPR and other outlets. Prior to joining NPR in 2011, she was widely published as a writer and critic on both classical and world music, and was the North America editor for Gramophone Magazine and the classical music columnist for Billboard.

Born in Boston, Tsioulcas was trained from an early age as a classical violinist and violist. She holds a B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University in comparative religion.

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Story Archive

"We're reduced to being something on sight," says Lawrence Brownlee. The tenor sings a new song cycle with music by Tyshawn Sorey and words by Terrance Hayes. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

A New Song Cycle Contemplates Blackness

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India.Arie, performing onstage during the pre-telecast Grammy Awards ceremony in New York City in January 2018. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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All Songs +1: India.Arie Talks About Worth And The Grammys

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On top of the world: Tower Records founder Russ Solomon above his Sacramento, Calif., store in 1989 Courtesy of "All Things Must Pass" hide caption

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Courtesy of "All Things Must Pass"

Tower Records Founder Russ Solomon Has Died At Age 92

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Recording Academy and MusiCares president and CEO Neil Portnow, onstage during the Grammy Awards at Madison Square Garden on Jan. 28 in New York City. Michael Kovac/Getty Images for NARAS hide caption

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Michael Kovac/Getty Images for NARAS