Anastasia Tsioulcas Anastasia Tsioulcas is a correspondent on NPR's Culture desk.
Anastasia Tsioulcas
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Anastasia Tsioulcas

Anastasia Tsioulcas
Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Anastasia Tsioulcas

Correspondent, Culture

Anastasia Tsioulcas is a correspondent on NPR's Culture desk. She is intensely interested in the arts at the intersection of culture, politics, economics and identity, and primarily reports on music. Recently, she has extensively covered gender issues and #MeToo in the music industry, including the trial and conviction of former R&B superstar R. Kelly; backstage tumult and alleged secret deals in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against megastar singer Plácido Domingo; and gender inequity issues at the Grammy Awards.

On happier days, Tsioulcas has celebrated the life of the late Aretha Franklin, traveled to Havana to profile musicians and dancers, revealed the hidden artistry of an Indian virtuoso who spent 60 years in her apartment and brought listeners into the creative process of composers Steve Reich and Terry Riley.

Tsioulcas was formerly a reporter and producer for NPR Music, where she covered breaking news in the music industry as well as a wide range of musical genres and artists. She has also produced episodes for NPR Music's much-lauded Tiny Desk concert series and has hosted live concerts from venues like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge. She also commissioned and produced several world premieres on behalf of NPR Music, including a live event that brought together 350 musicians to debut a new work together. As a video producer, she created high-profile video shorts for NPR Music, including performances by cellist Yo-Yo Ma in a Brooklyn theatrical props warehouse and pianist Yuja Wang in an icy-cold Steinway & Sons piano factory.

Tsioulcas has also reported from north and west Africa, south Asia, and across Europe for NPR and other outlets. Prior to joining NPR in 2011, she was widely published as a writer and critic on both classical and world music, and was the North America editor for Gramophone Magazine and the classical music columnist for Billboard.

Born in Boston and based in New York, Tsioulcas is a lapsed classical violinist and violist (shoutout to all the overlooked violists!). She graduated from Barnard College, Columbia University with a B.A. in comparative religion.

Story Archive

The Mexican band Son Rompe Pera, one of the highlights of the 2022 edition of the WOMEX festival. Marc van der Aa/Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Marc van der Aa/Courtesy of the artists

Three global bands to look out for, courtesy of WOMEX

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Anjelica Huston as Morticia Addams and Raul Julia as Gomez Addams in Addams Family Values. Paramount Pictures/Cinematic Collection/Alamy Stock Photo hide caption

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Paramount Pictures/Cinematic Collection/Alamy Stock Photo

Zoe Kazan and Carey Mulligan depict reporters Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey in She Said. JoJo Whilden/Universal Pictures hide caption

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JoJo Whilden/Universal Pictures

Jerry Lee Lewis, in a photo taken during his infamous trip to London in June 1958, when it became public that he was married to his 13-year-old cousin. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

Jerry Lee Lewis has died at age 87

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Sri Lankan author Shehan Karunatilaka holds his book The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida at the Shaw Theatre in London on Oct. 14. On Monday, his novel won the 2022 Booker Prize. Daniel Leal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal/AFP via Getty Images

Charges are dropped against Adnan Syed, subject of true crime podcast 'Serial'

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Adnan Syed (center), leaving court on Sept. 19. He was released after a judge overturned his conviction in the 1999 murder of Hae Min Lee. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Brian Witte/AP

Prosecutors drop charges against Adnan Syed, the subject of 'Serial' podcast

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Composer and trumpeter Etienne Charles, in a portrait taken inside the newly renovated David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center. Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of Lincoln Center hide caption

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Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of Lincoln Center

Revisiting San Juan Hill, the neighborhood destroyed to make way for Lincoln Center

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Murder conviction is overturned for Adnan Syed of 'Serial' podcast

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Adnan Syed leaves the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse in Baltimore, Maryland, on Feb. 5, 2016. The Maryland man, whose 2000 murder conviction was thrown into question by the popular "Serial" podcast, was in court to argue he deserved a new trial because his lawyers had done a poor job with his case. Carlos Barria/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

Adnan Syed, subject of 'Serial' podcast, is released after his conviction is vacated

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A 1952 portrait of Greek actress Irene Papas taken in Paris. Papas died Wednesday at age 96. International News Photos/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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International News Photos/AFP via Getty Images