Anastasia Tsioulcas Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter for NPR Music. She covers breaking news in the music industry, as well as a wide range of musical genres and artists, for NPR's flagship news programs and NPR Music.
Anastasia Tsioulcas
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Anastasia Tsioulcas

Anastasia Tsioulcas
Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Anastasia Tsioulcas

Reporter, NPR Music

Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter for NPR Music. She covers breaking news in the music industry, as well as a wide range of musical genres and artists, for NPR's flagship news programs and NPR Music.

Tsioulcas is intensely interested in the arts at the intersection of culture, politics, economics, and identity. She covers #MeToo and gender issues in the music industry, as well as the effects of US immigration and travel policy on musicians and other performers traveling to this country.

She has reported from the funeral of Aretha Franklin, profiled musicians and dancers in contemporary Cuba, and brought listeners into the creative process of composers Steve Reich and Terry Riley.

Tsioulcas also produces episodes for NPR Music's much-lauded Tiny Desk concert series, and has hosted live concerts from venues like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge. She has also commissioned and produced several world premieres on behalf of NPR Music, including a live event that brought together 350 musicians on the steps of the Brooklyn Public Library.

As a video producer, she has created high-profile video shorts for NPR Music, including performances by cellist Yo-Yo Ma in a Brooklyn theatrical props warehouse and pianist Yuja Wang in an icy-cold Steinway & Sons piano factory in Queens.

Tsioulcas has reported from across Europe, north and west Africa, south Asia, and Cuba for NPR and other outlets. Prior to joining NPR in 2011, she was widely published as a writer and critic on both classical and world music, and was the North America editor for Gramophone Magazine and the classical music columnist for Billboard.

Born in Boston, Tsioulcas was trained from an early age as a classical violinist and violist. She holds a B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University in comparative religion.

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Archbishop Franzo King who, with his wife Marina, co-founded the St. John Will-I-Am Coltrane African Orthodox Church, in a portrait shot in Jan. 2020. Colin Marshall/NPR hide caption

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Five Decades On, An Eclectic Church Preaches The Message Of John Coltrane

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A 1939 portrait of opera singer Lawrence Tibbett, the co-founder and first president of the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA). Fairfax Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer to President Trump, listens to closing statements during a House Oversight Committee hearing in February 2019. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Fired A 'Faux-Bama,' Michael Cohen Says In Tell-All Memoir

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Journalist Gretchen Carlson addresses the crowd before the planned screening of Surviving R. Kelly in New York on Dec. 4, 2018. The room was evacuated after a gun threat was called in. Chance Yeh/Getty Images for A&E hide caption

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An attorney for R. Kelly, seen in May 2019, said his client "had nothing to do with any of these alleged acts by those charged." Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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New York Philharmonic first violinist Kuan Cheng Lu, playing for a socially distanced audience of two at Lincoln Center on July 31. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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During A Lonely New York Summer, Lincoln Center Brings Music To Essential Workers

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The Young People's Chorus of New York City, performing back in better times. Alexey Konkov/Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Is Singing Together Safe In The Era Of Coronavirus? Not Really, Experts Say

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Pianist Yuja Wang (pictured), violinist Leonidas Kavakos and several prominent academics have been accused this week of making anti-Black comments. Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images