Ailsa Chang Ailsa Chang hosts All Things Considered, and is a correspondent for NPR's Planet Money.
Mike Morgan Photography/Mike Morgan
Ailsa Chang 2017
Mike Morgan Photography/Mike Morgan

Ailsa Chang

Host, All Things Considered; Correspondent, Planet Money

Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered along with Ari Shapiro, Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelly, and is a correspondent for NPR's Planet Money. She landed in public radio after practicing law for a few years.

Her colleagues still let her geek out on the law at Planet Money, where she's covered privacy rights in the cell phone age, the government's doomed fight to stop racist trademarks, and the money laundering case federal agents built against one of President Trump's top campaign advisors.

Previously, she was a congressional correspondent with NPR's Washington desk. She covered battles over healthcare, immigration, gun control, executive branch appointments, and the federal budget.

Chang started out as a radio reporter in 2009, and has since earned a string of national awards for her work. In 2012, she was honored with the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for her investigation into the New York City Police Department's "stop-and-frisk" policy and allegations of unlawful marijuana arrests by officers. The series also earned honors from Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

She was also the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Award, a National Headliner Award, and an honor from Investigative Reporters and Editors for her investigation on how Detroit's broken public defender system leaves lawyers with insufficient resources to effectively represent their clients.

In 2011, the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association named Chang as the winner of the Art Athens Award for General Excellence in Individual Reporting for radio. In 2015, she won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association for her coverage of Capitol Hill.

Prior to coming to NPR, Chang was an investigative reporter at NPR Member station WNYC from 2009 to 2012 in New York City, focusing on criminal justice and legal affairs. She was a Kroc fellow at NPR from 2008 to 2009, as well as a reporter and producer for NPR Member station KQED in San Francisco.

The former lawyer served as a law clerk to Judge John T. Noonan, Jr. on the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco.

Chang graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University where she received her bachelor's degree.

She earned her law degree with distinction from Stanford Law School, where she won the Irving Hellman, Jr. Special Award for the best piece written by a student in the Stanford Law Review in 2001.

Chang was also a Fulbright Scholar at Oxford University, where she received a master's degree in media law. And she has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she never got to have a dog. But now she's the proud mama of Mickey Chang, a shih tzu who enjoys slapping high-fives and mingling with senators.

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Story Archive

The Name Behind This Year's Most Popular Album? P.T. Barnum

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America's Next Top Rest Stop: An App Compiles The Best Gas Station Bathrooms

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Zero-Sum Tactics That Built Trump Inc. Could Backfire With World Leaders

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As America Turns A Year Older, Poll Finds Patriotism Has Slipped A Bit

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White House Launches Effort To Take Citizenship From Those Who Lied To Get It

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On Independence Day, Minting Thousands Of New Americans

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Michael Hayden, former Director of the CIA and NSA, speaks at Nobel Week Dialogue: the Future of Truth conference on Dec. 9, 2017, in Gothenburg, Sweden. Julia Reinhart/Getty Images hide caption

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Ex-CIA Director On National Security, Post-Truth 'Assault On Intelligence'

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By some estimates, nearly half of the people confined in U.S. jails and prisons have a mental illness, notes Alisa Roth, author of Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Darrin Klimek/Getty Images hide caption

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'Insane': America's 3 Largest Psychiatric Facilities Are Jails

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Alex Wagner is a co-host of The Circus on Showtime and a contributing editor at The Atlantic. Above, she speaks at the 69th Writers Guild Awards on Feb. 19, 2017, in New York City. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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In 'The New Face Of America,' Journalist Alex Wagner Saw Herself

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Protester Jack Willis, 26, demonstrates outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia. Police arrested two black men who were waiting inside a Center City Starbucks which prompted an apology from the company's CEO. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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A Lesson In How To Overcome Implicit Bias

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Bernie Dalton (right) and Essence Goldman (center) signing copies of Bernie And The Believer's album Connection Courtesy of Essence Goldman hide caption

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Courtesy of Essence Goldman

'He Wants To Be Remembered': Tiny Desk Contestant Finds His Voice While Fighting ALS

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Police officers in Lawrence, Kan. watch thunderstorms move past the city in 2008. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Basketball, Marijuana And Poetry: These Police Tweet More Than Crime Alerts

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Boston Marathon women's winner Desiree Linden celebrates after she crosses the finish line on Monday. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Runner Tells Herself 'Just Show Up For One More Mile' — And Wins The Boston Marathon

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People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against white nationalists in Charlottesville, Va. on Aug. 12, 2017. Kelly won a Pulitzer Prize for the image. Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP hide caption

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Pulitzer-Winning Photographer Made Charlottesville Photo On His Last Day On The Job

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Zhuang Liehong with his wife, Little Yan, and one of his sons, Kaizhi, in 2013 — a year before immigrating to the United States. Courtesy of Zhuang Liehong hide caption

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Chinese Dissident Finds Struggles, Independence In America After Immigrating

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