Ailsa Chang Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered.
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Pedestrians pass the Dow Jones display ticker in Times Square on Wednesday in New York. U.S. shoppers spent cautiously this holiday season, a disappointment for retailers that slashed prices to lure people into stores and now must hope for a post-Christmas burst of spending. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Retail Workers Bear Brunt Of Sluggish Holiday Sales

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Raj Rajaratnam, center, billionaire co-founder of Galleon Group, is surrounded by photographers as leaves Manhattan federal court May 11 after being convicted of insider trading charges. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

HSBC has agreed to pay $1.92 billion to settle a multiyear U.S. criminal probe into money-laundering lapses at the British lender, the largest penalty ever paid by a bank. Edgard Garrido/Landov/Reuters hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/Landov/Reuters

HSBC Critic: Too Big To Indict May Mean Too Big To Exist

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Camden City Police Chief Scott Thomson says he has shooting investigations "backlogging like burglary cases." Half of his force was laid off last year, and the city says expensive benefits in the police union contract are preventing them from hiring more cops. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

Crime-Ridden Camden To Dump City Police Force

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In His First Big Move, Citigroup CEO Cuts 11,000 Jobs

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Maurice Geddie of Brooklyn's Red Hook neighborhood picks up a free turkey donated by a local grocery store. He's hoping his wife will be willing to cook it, though she's been stuck cooking for storm victims at shelters for weeks. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Sandy Victims Get Bird's-Eye View Of Homelessness

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Volunteers help to clean up in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Paul Nicaj, who owns Battery Gardens Restaurant on the southern tip of Manhattan, says Superstorm Sandy will cost him a few hundred thousand dollars, including income from two weddings that may have to be cancelled this weekend. Ailsa Chang /NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang /NPR