Ailsa Chang Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered.
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Ailsa Chang

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Ailsa Chang 2017
Mike Morgan /NPR

Ailsa Chang

Host, All Things Considered

Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered along with Ari Shapiro, Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelly. She landed in public radio after practicing law for a few years.

Chang is a former Planet Money correspondent, where she got to geek out on the law while covering the underground asylum industry in the largest Chinatown in America, privacy rights in the cell phone age, the government's doomed fight to stop racist trademarks, and the money laundering case federal agents built against one of President Trump's top campaign advisers.

Previously, she was a congressional correspondent with NPR's Washington Desk. She covered battles over healthcare, immigration, gun control, executive branch appointments, and the federal budget.

Chang started out as a radio reporter in 2009, and has since earned a string of national awards for her work. In 2012, she was honored with the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for her investigation into the New York City Police Department's "stop-and-frisk" policy and allegations of unlawful marijuana arrests by officers. The series also earned honors from Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

She was also the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Award, a National Headliner Award, and an honor from Investigative Reporters and Editors for her investigation on how Detroit's broken public defender system leaves lawyers with insufficient resources to effectively represent their clients.

In 2011, the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association named Chang as the winner of the Art Athens Award for General Excellence in Individual Reporting for radio. In 2015, she won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association for her coverage of Capitol Hill.

Prior to coming to NPR, Chang was an investigative reporter at NPR Member station WNYC from 2009 to 2012 in New York City, focusing on criminal justice and legal affairs. She was a Kroc fellow at NPR from 2008 to 2009, as well as a reporter and producer for NPR Member station KQED in San Francisco.

The former lawyer served as a law clerk to Judge John T. Noonan Jr. on the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco.

Chang graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University where she received her bachelor's degree.

She earned her law degree with distinction from Stanford Law School, where she won the Irving Hellman Jr. Special Award for the best piece written by a student in the Stanford Law Review in 2001.

Chang was also a Fulbright Scholar at Oxford University, where she received a master's degree in media law. She also has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she never got to have a dog. But now she's the proud mama of Mickey Chang, a shih tzu who enjoys slapping high-fives and mingling with senators.

Story Archive

The Ubiquitous, Confounding, Misunderstood 5 Stages Of Grief

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Drastic Drop In Life Expectancy Is Far Steeper For Black And Latino Populations

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Oh Flock... Clever Cockatoos Are More Culturally Complex Than We Thought

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How The Pegasus Spyware Worked

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How Giannis Antetokounmpo Got From Athens To The Pantheon Of The NBA

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After A Long Wait, Peru Has A New President-Elect

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Real Life Sports Coaches Are Taking Notes From Ted Lasso

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A Survivor Reacts To California's Reparations Program For Forced Sterilizations

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'Unsafe In Foster Care' Investigates How A System To Keep Kids Safe Can Harm Them

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Utah's Great Salt Lake Is Turning Into Dust

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A man wearing a face mask walks past the Olympic Rings ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The Games are scheduled to begin this week in Japan despite a global rise in coronavirus cases. Toru Hanai/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Positive COVID Cases, Team USA CEO Says Athletes Are Ready To Compete

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Remembering Rufino Rodriguez, Beloved NICU Respiratory Therapist And COVID-19 Victim

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In a time when facts are political, Amarante thinks "maybe theater, drama, can be remembered as a vehicle to reflect a truth." Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Rodrigo Amarante And His Great Musical Tantrum

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How Competing Without Fans In The Stands Could Affect Olympic Athletes' Performances

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The Young, The Old And The Odd At This Year's Tour De France

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