Ailsa Chang Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered.
Ailsa Chang 2017 square
Stories By

Ailsa Chang

Mike Morgan /NPR
Ailsa Chang 2017
Mike Morgan /NPR

Ailsa Chang

Host, All Things Considered

Ailsa Chang is an award-winning journalist who hosts All Things Considered along with Ari Shapiro, Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelly. She landed in public radio after practicing law for a few years.

Chang is a former Planet Money correspondent, where she got to geek out on the law while covering the underground asylum industry in the largest Chinatown in America, privacy rights in the cell phone age, the government's doomed fight to stop racist trademarks, and the money laundering case federal agents built against one of President Trump's top campaign advisers.

Previously, she was a congressional correspondent with NPR's Washington Desk. She covered battles over healthcare, immigration, gun control, executive branch appointments, and the federal budget.

Chang started out as a radio reporter in 2009, and has since earned a string of national awards for her work. In 2012, she was honored with the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for her investigation into the New York City Police Department's "stop-and-frisk" policy and allegations of unlawful marijuana arrests by officers. The series also earned honors from Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

She was also the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Award, a National Headliner Award, and an honor from Investigative Reporters and Editors for her investigation on how Detroit's broken public defender system leaves lawyers with insufficient resources to effectively represent their clients.

In 2011, the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association named Chang as the winner of the Art Athens Award for General Excellence in Individual Reporting for radio. In 2015, she won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association for her coverage of Capitol Hill.

Prior to coming to NPR, Chang was an investigative reporter at NPR Member station WNYC from 2009 to 2012 in New York City, focusing on criminal justice and legal affairs. She was a Kroc fellow at NPR from 2008 to 2009, as well as a reporter and producer for NPR Member station KQED in San Francisco.

The former lawyer served as a law clerk to Judge John T. Noonan Jr. on the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in San Francisco.

Chang graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University where she received her bachelor's degree.

She earned her law degree with distinction from Stanford Law School, where she won the Irving Hellman Jr. Special Award for the best piece written by a student in the Stanford Law Review in 2001.

Chang was also a Fulbright Scholar at Oxford University, where she received a master's degree in media law. She also has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she never got to have a dog. But now she's the proud mama of Mickey Chang, a shih tzu who enjoys slapping high-fives and mingling with senators.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The cast and crew of Minari attends the 2020 Sundance Film Festival film premeire at Library Center Theater on Jan. 26, 2020 in Park City, Utah. Chung is second from the right. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cindy Ord/Getty Images

'Minari' Director Reflects On The Yi Family's Experience, And Parallels To His Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971100339/971105614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Post-Impeachment Washington, Now What?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/968150268/968150269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Look At The New U.S. Coronavirus Variants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/968150348/968150349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, pictured in December, is 66% effective at preventing moderate and severe disease. But Dr. Paul Stoffels of Johnson & Johnson says what matters more is preventing hospitalizations and deaths, which it did completely. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson Executive Says Vaccine Works Where It Counts: Preventing Deaths

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962221448/962229465" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez receives the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in late December at Gallup Indian Medical Center in Gallup, N.M. Noel Lyn Smith/USA Today Network via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Lyn Smith/USA Today Network via Reuters

Navajo Nation Begins Mass Vaccinations After Lifting Lockdown Order

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962108912/962228179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Weezer's new record, OK Human, is an orchestral affair, recorded back to back with a heavy metal album. Brendan Walter/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Walter/Courtesy of the artist

Rivers Cuomo On Weezer's Latest, 'OK Human,' And The Need To Riff (Or Not)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962124558/962190272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

South Dakota has given out about 75% of the vaccine doses it's received, a high rate among states. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

South Dakota Health Leader On How The State Has Gotten Its Vaccine Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/960474719/960486462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mike Milosh says that Home, his latest album as the leader of Rhye, is a product of managing pandemic-era stress and fear alongside creativity. Emma Marie Jenkinson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Marie Jenkinson/Courtesy of the artist

Even In Isolation, Rhye Makes Music For Us To Come Together

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959659228/959700156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lydia Mobley, an ICU nurse pictured on Dec. 18, 2020, when she received her first dose of a coronavirus vaccine, says her hospital in central Michigan is "seeing more COVID patients, which means more people dying." Lydia Mobley hide caption

toggle caption
Lydia Mobley

ICU Nurse Says Careless Attitudes Around COVID-19 Are 'A Slap In The Face'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956988994/957206854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Colleagues, family and friends attend the August funeral of Los Angeles police Officer Valentin Martinez, the agency's first sworn officer to die of complications from COVID-19. Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

As COVID-19 Ravages His Force, LAPD Chief Looks To Boost Confidence In Vaccine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956895749/956927762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former FBI Director James Comey, here in 2017, says he was "sickened" by last week's attack on the Capitol. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

James Comey: Trump Should Be Impeached But Not Federally Prosecuted

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956103556/956170992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Los Angeles County paramedics examine a potential COVID-19 patient sitting on a curb before transporting him to a hospital in Hawthorne, Calif., on Dec. 29. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

'Things Are Worse Than People Think': LA County Official On New Directives For EMS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/953653359/953653360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Minnesota has administered about 39% of the vaccine doses it has received. About 1.5% of the state's population has been vaccinated. Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images

Minnesota Health Official Says Vaccine Rollout Hasn't Been As Bad As It Seems

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/953314568/953314569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti visits a coronavirus vaccination site at the city's Lincoln Park on Wednesday. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Amid Health Care Worker Shortage, LA Mayor Presses For Faster Vaccine Rollout

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/952325872/952445644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript