Kirk Siegler Kirk Siegler is a correspondent for NPR's National Desk. In this role he covers Southern California and the West from NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA.
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Kirk Siegler 2017
Melissa Kuypers/NPR

Kirk Siegler

Correspondent, National Desk

As a correspondent on NPR's national desk, Kirk Siegler covers the urban-rural divide in America. A beat exploring the intersection between urban and rural life, culture, and politics, Siegler has recently brought listeners and readers to a timber town in Idaho that lost its last sawmill just days before the 2016 election, as well as to small rural towns in Nebraska where police are fighting an influx in recreational marijuana coming from nearby Colorado cities.

Based at NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA, but frequently roaming the country, Siegler's reporting has also focused on the far-reaching economic impacts of the drought in the West while explaining the broader, national significance to many of the region's complex and bitter disputes around land use. His assignments have brought listeners to the heart of anti-government standoffs in Oregon and Nevada, including a rare interview with recalcitrant rancher Cliven Bundy in 2014.

Siegler also contributes extensively to the network's breaking news coverage. In 2015, he was awarded an International Reporting Project fellowship from Johns Hopkins University to report on health and development in Nepal. While en route to the country in April, the worst magnitude earthquake to hit the region in more than 80 years struck. Siegler was one of the first foreign journalists to arrive in Kathmandu and helped lead NPR's coverage of the immediate aftermath of the deadly quake. He also filed in-depth reports focusing on the humanitarian disaster and challenges of bringing relief to some of the Nepal's far-flung rural villages.

Prior to joining NPR, Siegler spent seven years reporting from Colorado, where he became a familiar voice to NPR listeners reporting on politics, water, and the state's ski industry from Denver for NPR Member Station KUNC. He got his start in political reporting covering the Montana Legislature for Montana Public Radio.

Apart from a brief stint working as a waiter in Sydney, Australia, Siegler has spent most of his adult life living in the West. He grew up near Missoula, Montana, and received a journalism degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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Story Archive

Jimmy Mejia and his wife, Patty Garrido, are being evicted from their South Los Angeles apartment. They're having trouble finding new housing they can afford. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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California Housing Crisis: Working But On The Brink Of Homelessness

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California Experiences An Alarming Spike In Homelessness

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Los Alamitos Mayor Pro Tem Warren Kusumoto argues his small city is caught in the middle of a legal fight between the Trump administration and the state of California. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Conservative California Cities Revolt Against State's Anti-Trump Policies

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A cow grazes a stretch of open range north of Albuquerque, N.M. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

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Why The Iconic Marlboro Man Image Is Fading In The West

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Protesters arrived in chartered buses to fight a plan by Orange County to relocate homeless people from Santa Ana to new temporary shelters in more affluent coastal cities. Linda Wang/NPR hide caption

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California County Faces Bitter Backlash Over Homeless Relocation Plans

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Last December, a gunman opened fire at Aztec High School, killing two students and then himself. The shooting received little attention in the national media. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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After A Deadly Shooting, School Moves On But The Trauma Remains

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Why Some Educators In New Mexico Are Calling For Teachers To Be Armed

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Months Before Fla. School Shooting, N.M. Deaths Got Little Notice

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At An Idaho Ski Club, A Window Into A Bygone Era

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Gary Stone of the Otero County Cattlemen's Association says ranchers held off activists who wanted a Bundy-style protest over control of federal land. Instead they waged their battle in the courts. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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In Rural New Mexico, Ranchers Wage Their Battle Through The Courts

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Members of the small Jewish community of Whitefish, Mont., a resort town 60 miles south of the Canadian border, believe a line was crossed between free speech rights and credible threats of violence. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Descending On A Montana Town, Neo-Nazi Trolls Test Where Free Speech Ends

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Long-time locals in Orofino, Idaho, like to boast that their town was built by natural resources, and for the most part, that's what keeps the economy going today. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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1 Year After Trump, Some In Rural West Still Feel Disconnect With Washington

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Westerners Worry About Bundy's Defiant Stand Against Feds

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Ammon Bundy (from left), Ryan Payne and Ryan Bundy on the day a mistrial was declared last month. They were joined by Jeanette Finicum, widow of Robert "LaVoy" Finicum, and Ryan's wife and daughter. John Locher/AP hide caption

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Judge Dismisses Federal Case Against Cliven Bundy And Sons, Bars Retrial

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