Kirk Siegler Kirk Siegler is a correspondent for NPR's National Desk. In this role he covers Southern California and the West from NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA.
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Kirk Siegler

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Kirk Siegler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Kirk Siegler

Correspondent, National Desk

As a correspondent on NPR's national desk, Kirk Siegler covers the urban-rural divide in America. A beat exploring the intersection between urban and rural life, culture, and politics, Siegler has recently brought listeners and readers to a timber town in Idaho that lost its last sawmill just days before the 2016 election, as well as to small rural towns in Nebraska where police are fighting an influx in recreational marijuana coming from nearby Colorado cities.

Based at NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA, but frequently roaming the country, Siegler's reporting has also focused on the far-reaching economic impacts of the drought in the West while explaining the broader, national significance to many of the region's complex and bitter disputes around land use. His assignments have brought listeners to the heart of anti-government standoffs in Oregon and Nevada, including a rare interview with recalcitrant rancher Cliven Bundy in 2014.

Siegler also contributes extensively to the network's breaking news coverage. In 2015, he was awarded an International Reporting Project fellowship from Johns Hopkins University to report on health and development in Nepal. While en route to the country in April, the worst magnitude earthquake to hit the region in more than 80 years struck. Siegler was one of the first foreign journalists to arrive in Kathmandu and helped lead NPR's coverage of the immediate aftermath of the deadly quake. He also filed in-depth reports focusing on the humanitarian disaster and challenges of bringing relief to some of the Nepal's far-flung rural villages.

Prior to joining NPR, Siegler spent seven years reporting from Colorado, where he became a familiar voice to NPR listeners reporting on politics, water, and the state's ski industry from Denver for NPR Member Station KUNC. He got his start in political reporting covering the Montana Legislature for Montana Public Radio.

Apart from a brief stint working as a waiter in Sydney, Australia, Siegler has spent most of his adult life living in the West. He grew up near Missoula, Montana, and received a journalism degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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Story Archive

A mobile home park destroyed by last year's wildfire in Paradise, California. Those rebuilding homes and lives say they're getting contradictory messages about whether the water is safe to drink. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Water Uncertainty Frustrates Victims Of California's Worst Wildfire

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Bureau Of Land Management's Acting Director Faces Controversy

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Federal Judge Awards Jewish Woman $14 Million In Case Against Neo-Nazi Trolls

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Five years ago, Ripple Desai opened the Tandoori Taqueria in her hometown of Panguitch, Utah, tapping into a growing tourist market. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Utah's 'Tandoori Taqueria' Brings Unexpected Indian Spice To Cowboy Country

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Located between Capitol Reef and Bryce Canyon and Zion national parks, the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has become a big tourist draw since its designation in 1996. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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When Everybody Wants A Piece Of 'God's Country'

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Forest Service Chief Pushes For Change In Fire Prevention

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Federal Land Managers Propose Rule Change To Fast Track Forest Management Projects

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A logger cuts a large fir tree in the Umpqua National Forest near Oakridge, Ore. Federal land managers are proposing a sweeping rule change that could expand commercial logging on Forest Service land. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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The Camp Fire leveled homes in the Ridgewood Mobile Home Park. Months later, the burned debris still has yet to be cleared away as seen in these photos taken on April 26, 2019. Meredith Rizzo hide caption

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Returning To Paradise

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Efseaff says this area of land could serve the community in the future as a park and a firebreak. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Rethinking Disaster Recovery After A California Town Is Leveled By Wildfire

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The CEO at the Ogallala Community Hospital in Ogallala, Neb., began offering $100,000 signing bonuses to attract doctors to the town. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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The Struggle To Hire And Keep Doctors In Rural Areas Means Patients Go Without Care

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Investigators Confirm PG&E Power Lines Caused 2018's Camp Fire

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A burned-out property sits next to a home that's still standing near Paradise six months after the Camp Fire. The fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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More Than 1,000 Families Still Searching For Homes 6 Months After The Camp Fire

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Rural Students To Join In Classroom Walkout Over Climate Change

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