Kirk Siegler Kirk Siegler is a correspondent for NPR's National Desk. In this role he covers Southern California and the West from NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA.
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Kirk Siegler

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Kirk Siegler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Kirk Siegler

Correspondent, National Desk

As a correspondent on NPR's national desk, Kirk Siegler covers the urban-rural divide in America. A beat exploring the intersection between urban and rural life, culture, and politics, Siegler has recently brought listeners and readers to a timber town in Idaho that lost its last sawmill just days before the 2016 election, as well as to small rural towns in Nebraska where police are fighting an influx in recreational marijuana coming from nearby Colorado cities.

Based at NPR West's studios in Culver City, CA, but frequently roaming the country, Siegler's reporting has also focused on the far-reaching economic impacts of the drought in the West while explaining the broader, national significance to many of the region's complex and bitter disputes around land use. His assignments have brought listeners to the heart of anti-government standoffs in Oregon and Nevada, including a rare interview with recalcitrant rancher Cliven Bundy in 2014.

Siegler also contributes extensively to the network's breaking news coverage. In 2015, he was awarded an International Reporting Project fellowship from Johns Hopkins University to report on health and development in Nepal. While en route to the country in April, the worst magnitude earthquake to hit the region in more than 80 years struck. Siegler was one of the first foreign journalists to arrive in Kathmandu and helped lead NPR's coverage of the immediate aftermath of the deadly quake. He also filed in-depth reports focusing on the humanitarian disaster and challenges of bringing relief to some of the Nepal's far-flung rural villages.

Prior to joining NPR, Siegler spent seven years reporting from Colorado, where he became a familiar voice to NPR listeners reporting on politics, water, and the state's ski industry from Denver for NPR Member Station KUNC. He got his start in political reporting covering the Montana Legislature for Montana Public Radio.

Apart from a brief stint working as a waiter in Sydney, Australia, Siegler has spent most of his adult life living in the West. He grew up near Missoula, Montana, and received a journalism degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

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Story Archive

Paradise Irrigation District manager Kevin Phillips shows a sample of the town's water pipes, which were frequently woven between underground root systems that were likely burned during the fire. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Paradise, Calif., Water Is Contaminated But Residents Are Moving Back Anyway

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Like most American ski areas, Mammoth Mountain Ski Area operates on U.S. Forest Service land thanks to a federal lease. Shrinking federal budgets to maintain recreational access to public lands mean locals have to be creative to keep trails open and safe. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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On Public Lands, Visitors Surge While Federal Management Funds Decline

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Michael Avenatti, Stormy Daniels' Former Attorney, Charged With Fraud

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A message card sits among a collection of flowers left at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens in New Zealand on Saturday. A 28-year-old white supremacist accused in the mass shootings at two mosques that left dozens of people dead stood silently before a judge on Saturday. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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A 'Mainstreaming Of Bigotry' As White Extremism Reveals Its Global Reach

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Orange County, Calif., School District Responds To Students' Offensive Social Media

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Cal Poly architecture students focused on reimagining and rebuilding Paradise, Calif., by presenting models, renderings and updated concepts during a community forum in Chico, Calif. Jason Halley, CSU, Chico hide caption

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Jason Halley, CSU, Chico

'Reimagining Paradise' — Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire

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Why Snowpack Forecasts Are Important In California

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Paradise, Calif., Holds Memorial For 85 Killed In Fire

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The Camp Fire burned so hot and intense there is little remaining in the mountains near Concow, Calif. Residents would like to camp out on their properties, but the federal government says they have to wait until toxic debris is cleared. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Residents Of Paradise And Other Towns Destroyed By Wildfire Must Wait To Go Home

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Toxic Debris Forces Camp Fire Victims To Stop Living On Their Land

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There are still burned out cars, school buses, and toxic debris all over Paradise, Calif. Neighborhoods remain unrecognizable to even longtime residents. Alisa Barba/NPR hide caption

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For Many Fire Evacuees, There's Still No Going Back To Paradise

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An abandoned RV at the last remaining Red Cross shelter providing housing for victims of the Camp Fire in California. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Camp Fire Victims Race To Find Housing Before The Last Shelter Closes

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