Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
Allison Shelley/NPR
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been a Distinguished Visiting Professional in Residence at American University, where he is now an adjunct professor. In this role, Elving received American University's 2016 University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown University.

He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as the manager of NPR's Washington coverage, NPR reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Trump Walks Back Comments At Putin Summit & DOJ Charges Russian Operative

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629903476/629932140" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin speak to the media during a joint press conference after their summit on Monday in Helsinki. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Weekend Politics: Trump And Putin, NATO, U.K.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629058557/629058558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, July 12

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628639888/628646838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many considered Brett Kavanaugh the front-runner to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, even before Kennedy announced his retirement. Despite his credentials, Kavanaugh still met resistance within Trump world. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Journalists set up in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building on Monday in anticipation of President Trump's announcing his next Supreme Court nomination Monday evening. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Trump Says He's Not Asking Justice Candidates About Abortion. Why Bother?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/625980931/625980932" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump spoke to March for Life participants and pro-life leaders at the White House on January 19. He has been signaling that he won't ask potential Supreme Court nominees about their positions on specific cases, but he doesn't need to — all on his short list are conservative judges. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Democrats And Republicans Preparing For Debate Over Supreme Court Seat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624416554/624416555" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President-elect Trump's acceptance speech was broadcast in Times Square in New York City after his 2016 election. Nearly two years later, the partisan divide grows even wider. Michael Reaves/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Reaves/Getty Images

Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement from the Supreme Court on Wednesday. President Trump said the process to replace him would "begin immediately." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Analysis: Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's Retirement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624058096/624083736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">