Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
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Ron Elving 2017
Meg Kelly/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been a Distinguished Visiting Professional in Residence at American University, where he is now an adjunct professor. In this role, Elving received American University's 2016 University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown University.

He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as the manager of NPR's Washington coverage, NPR reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

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This Week In Politics: U.S.-North Korea Relations

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In 2015, newly elected Speaker of the House Paul Ryan shakes hands with outgoing Speaker John Boehner alongside House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi at the U.S. Capitol. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A 2017 file photo of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. Democrats have called for Pruitt's resignation over a variety of spending scandals but President Trump and key Republicans have rallied to his defense. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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White House counsel Harriet Miers speaks after being nominated by President George W. Bush to the Supreme Court on Oct. 3, 2005. She would withdraw later that month after intense scrutiny of her qualificiations. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump speaks about the recently passed spending bill at the White House on Friday. Trump threatened to veto the bill before later signing it. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Lyndon B. Johnson is shown during his nationwide television broadcast from the White House on March 31, 1968. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Remembering 1968: LBJ Surprises Nation With Announcement He Won't Seek Re-Election

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Sen. Eugene McCarthy, D-Minn., waves to supporters in his campaign headquarters, March 13, 1968, the day after the New Hampshire primary showed strong support for his opposition to the Vietnam war. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Altogether, the Constitution has only been amended 17 times since the Bill of Rights, and one of those amendments (the 21st) was done just to repeal another (the 18th, known as Prohibition). National Archives via AP hide caption

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National Archives via AP