Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Ron Elving

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Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He is also a professorial lecturer and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University, where he has also taught in the School of Communication. In 2016, he was honored with the University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as manager of NPR's Washington desk from 1999 to 2014, the desk's reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

Story Archive

Democrats pull off climate, health and tax bill in weekend sessions

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Week In Politics: Job growth in a shrinking economy

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Abortion rights supporters cheer in Overland Park, Kansas, on Aug. 2 as the proposed Kansas constitutional amendment removing the right to an abortion fails. Kansas City Star/TNS hide caption

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Kansas City Star/TNS

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference following a meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee at the headquarters of the Federal Reserve on Wednesday after he announced the Fed was raising interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Then-President Donald Trump is seen on the screen above the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on Thursday in outtakes from his Jan. 7, 2021, video in which he refused to say he had lost the election. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Week in politics: Trump's actions on Jan. 6 revealed; Steve Bannon guilty of contempt

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Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR Politics Special: What We Learned From The Jan. 6 Hearings

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Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Exposing The Secrets Of The January 6th Attack

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Attorney Roy Cohn, left, confers with red-hunting Sen. Joseph McCarthy, R-Wisc., during Senate hearings in 1954. Keystone/Hulton Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Week in politics: Biden in Saudi; Jan. 6 committee subpoenas Secret Service texts

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Then-Sen. Joe Biden is seen with former President Jimmy Carter watching the proceedings at the Democratic National Convention in Denver in 2008 where Biden would be the party's vice presidential nominee. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics chat: Executive order on abortion access; Trump allies subpoenaed; jobs up

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Week in politics: Decisions from the Supreme Court supermajority reshape the U.S.

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