Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Ron Elving

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Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He is also a professorial lecturer and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University, where he has also taught in the School of Communication. In 2016, he was honored with the University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as manager of NPR's Washington desk from 1999 to 2014, the desk's reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

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DES MOINES, IOWA - FEBRUARY 3: Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and wife Dr. Jill Biden greet supporters at a caucus night watch party on February 3, 2020 in Des Moines, Iowa.(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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With Iowa No Longer First, Campaigns Will Have To Evolve

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) speaks during a news conference on Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Week in politics: Support for same-sex marriage in the Senate; more trouble for Trump

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President Biden, campaigning with gubernatorial candidate Wes Moore in Bowie, Maryland, on the eve of the U.S. midterm election. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Week in politics: Pelosi steps down; Trump announces 2024 presidential run

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2 new Ted Kennedy biographies are not just for Boomers but for voters of all ages

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Presidents Trump, Nixon, Ford and Kennedy all felt the impact of midterm elections in different ways. Drew Angerer/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images; AFP/Getty Images; National Archive/Newsmakers/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images; AFP/Getty Images; National Archive/Newsmakers/Getty Images

The midterms didn't produce a wave. Here's what that's meant historically

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Week in politics: After poor midterm showing, is Trump's influence waning?

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Week in politics: Concern over issues, tribalism drives people to the polls

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Week in politics: Speaker Pelosi's husband attacked; midterm analysis; support for Ukraine

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Week in politics: Bannon's prison sentence; Trumps subpoenaed; Biden announces deficit drop

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Week in politics: Georgia Senate debate; Jan 6. committee decision to subpoena Trump

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The Jan. 6 committee presented voted this week to subpoena former President Trump. The fate of the subpoena will likely be decided soon by the courts. The impact of the committee's work will likely take longer to gauge. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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