Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Ron Elving

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He is also a professorial lecturer and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University, where he has also taught in the School of Communication. In 2016, he was honored with the University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as manager of NPR's Washington desk from 1999 to 2014, the desk's reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

Story Archive

Friday

Then-President George W. Bush addresses the nation March 19, 2003 in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC. Bush announced that the U.S. military struck at "targets of opportunity" in Iraq on March 19, 2003 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: Potential for criminal indictment hangs over Trump campaign

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Sunday

Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina speaks during a Faith in America tour event at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, on Feb. 22. KC McGinnis/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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KC McGinnis/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: Garland visits Ukraine; how crime and antisemitism affect politics

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Saturday

Week in politics: President Biden's support for Ukraine; Sen. Tim Scott in Iowa

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Saturday

Week in politics: Health report for President Biden; Nikki Haley announces presidential run

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Gary Powers, accused of espionage over Russia in his U2 airplane, was tried in Moscow in August 1960. Powers endured months of interrogation, went through a Soviet show trial, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, and served nearly two years before he was traded for a Soviet spy. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Monday

Saturday

Week in politics: Mike Pence served a subpoena; State of the Union makes an impact

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Saturday

Week in politics: Job numbers; debt ceiling; State of the Union

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Saturday

Week in politics: U.S. reaches debt ceiling; a fruitless Supreme Court investigation

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For those on Capitol Hill who would threaten a default as a means to compel concessions on policy, the destructive power of default is what makes it makes attractive as a tactic. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Friday

The US Supreme Court said Thursday that an eight-month investigation that questioned 100 possible suspects had failed to find the source of the stunning leak last year of its draft abortion ruling. STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: Classified documents put Biden in a tricky political situation

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Monday

The history of a contentious U.S. Congress

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Sunday

Saturday

Week in politics: What Kevin McCarthy's election means for the next two years

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Thursday

Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., is flanked by Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., left, and Rep. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., right, in the House chamber as lawmakers meet for a second day to elect a speaker and convene the 118th Congress. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Monday

Sens. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., right, and Richard Shelby, R-Ala., worked together as the chairperson and ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee respectively on getting the spending bill through Congress. Both men are retiring from Congress. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: 2022 delivers another highly charged political year

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Thursday

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) awards the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Loretta Lynn in the East Room at the White House on November 20, 2013 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Saturday

Week in politics: Democrats win Georgia; Kyrsten Sinema defects to become an Independent

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Monday

DES MOINES, IOWA - FEBRUARY 3: Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and wife Dr. Jill Biden greet supporters at a caucus night watch party on February 3, 2020 in Des Moines, Iowa.(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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With Iowa No Longer First, Campaigns Will Have To Evolve

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