Ron Elving Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Ron Elving

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ron Elving at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ron Elving

Senior Editor and Correspondent, Washington Desk

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He is also a professorial lecturer and Executive in Residence in the School of Public Affairs at American University, where he has also taught in the School of Communication. In 2016, he was honored with the University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as manager of NPR's Washington desk from 1999 to 2014, the desk's reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

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Story Archive

How Did Framers Of The Constitution Come Up With 'High Crimes And Misdemeanors'?

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Former Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley's repeated pledges of allegiance to Trump in her new memoir, With All Due Respect, may surprise those who thought Haley had left the administration halfway through her term as some sort of protest. Here, Haley is seen at NPR's offices in New York City. Amr Alfiky for NPR hide caption

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American hostages are paraded by their Iranian captors on the first day of the occupation of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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40 Years Of 'Morning Edition': Political Stories That Lasted An Era And Beyond

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi gavels the close of the vote by the U.S. House of Representatives on a resolution formalizing the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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