Mara Liasson Mara Liasson is a national political correspondent for NPR.
Mara Liasson 2010
Stories By

Mara Liasson

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Mara Liasson 2010
Doby/NPR

Mara Liasson

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Mara Liasson is a national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazine programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered seven presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents' Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

Story Archive

Politics chat: Congress returns for a lame duck session

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US President Joe Biden speaks about the situation in Poland following a meeting with G7 and European leaders on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 16, 2022. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) speaks at his election night watch party after the midterm elections, early on November 9, 2022, in Washington, DC. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (C) attends a news conference following a GOP caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The party out of power usually has an advantage in Midterms. How did that play out?

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A sticker directs voters to a polling place at Alfred E. Smith Public School in New York City on November 8, 2022. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

Politics chat: Three must-watch races that could turn the Senate

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A polling place worker holds an "I'm a Georgia Voter" sticker to hand to a voter on June 9, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Politics chat: Biden visits Oregon and Pennsylvania; who will control House and Senate

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A close-up of the front of the United States 100-dollar bill bearing the portrait of US statesman, inventor and diplomat Benjamin Franklin is seen December 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images

Doom And Boom: We Break Down What's Happening In The Economy

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Politics chat: Five weeks to midterms, Supreme Court to hear key cases

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U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS), (L) Chair of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, and Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) preside over a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Final Jan. 6 Hearing Is Coming — Here's Everything We've Learned

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