Mara Liasson Mara Liasson is a national political correspondent for NPR.
Mara Liasson 2010
Stories By

Mara Liasson

Doby/NPR
Mara Liasson 2010
Doby/NPR

Mara Liasson

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Mara Liasson is a national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazine programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered seven presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents' Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

How Much Is Biden Willing To Compromise On His Infrastructure Plan?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993208974/993228279" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden Approaches The 100-Day Mark Of His Presidency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/990792658/990792659" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden Plans To Withdraw U.S. Troops From Afghanistan, Ending America's Longest War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/987371950/987371951" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Boehner Thinks The Republican Party Has Changed. Has It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986553852/986560589" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden And Harris Met With Bipartisan Lawmakers To Negotiate Infrastructure Package

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986537123/986537144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Politics Chat: The 2020 Election Is Over, But Issues Remain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986203254/986203255" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jimmy Stewart's 1939 performance in Mr. Smith Goes To Washington helped form the popular perception of a Senate filibuster, with a lawmaker talking for hours on end. It hasn't been like that for decades, but President Biden supports returning to that style. Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock hide caption

toggle caption
Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock

Why Possibly Changing The Filibuster Brings Threats Of Political 'Nuclear' War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981364153/982599357" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden campaigned on a proposal for a massive infrastructure plan to transform the economy and on the idea that he could work with Republicans. Trying to bring the infrastructure plan into reality forces a key decision on bipartisanship. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Building A Big Infrastructure Plan, Biden Starts With A Bridge To Republicans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/980086070/980234582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Politics Chat: Breaking Down The Political Responses To The Atlanta Shootings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/979683485/979683486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ron Klain, pictured in March 2020, is President Biden's chief of staff and comes to the role particularly qualified. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Ron Klain's Record: How Biden's Chief Of Staff Is Keeping The Trains Running

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/976173848/976205179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">