David Welna David Welna is NPR's national security correspondent.
David Welna, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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David Welna

A volunteer artist sets up a memorial May 20 in Brooklyn. Artists and volunteer organizers across New York City put up memorials throughout the five boroughs to honor those who died of COVID-19. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

The U.S., according to the World Health Organization, has paid none of this year's assessed fees and still owes $81 million from last year. Denis Balibouse/Reuters hide caption

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters

U.S. Was Behind On Payments To WHO Before Trump's Cutoff

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The acting secretary of the Navy is seeking a more thorough review of "decisions of the chain of command surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt." The aircraft carrier is seen here as it enters the port in Da Nang, Vietnam, last month. Nguyen Huy Kham/Reuters hide caption

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Nguyen Huy Kham/Reuters

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 hit a new milestone, surpassing the number of Americans who died in the prolonged conflict with Vietnam. Here, the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, N.Y., holds a vigil for medical workers and patients who have died in the pandemic. John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt is in the western North Pacific Ocean on March 18. The Navy has recommended reinstatement of the ship's captain who was fired after pleading for help with the coronavirus infection onboard. Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicholas/U.S. Navy via AP hide caption

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Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicholas/U.S. Navy via AP

Navy Capt. Brett Crozier is pictured in November 2019 on the USS Roosevelt. Navy officials have not ruled out reinstating him. He was fired as commander of the aircraft carrier after complaining wasn't getting enough help containing the coronavirus on board. Seaman Apprentice Nicholas Huynh/AP hide caption

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Seaman Apprentice Nicholas Huynh/AP

Three U.S. aircraft carriers USS Theodore Roosevelt (top left) USS Ronald Reagan (top center) and USS Nimitz (top right) participate in exercises with South Korean forces in 2017. South Korean Defense Ministry via AP hide caption

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South Korean Defense Ministry via AP

Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly testifies at a Senate hearing on Dec. 3. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

"Too naive or too stupid"

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U.S. Navy Captain Brett Crozier, who was relieved of command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt after sending a letter critical of the handling of a shipboard outbreak. U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy

Aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) arrives in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, April 27, 2018. The Roosevelt, currently docked in Guam, has reported dozens of cases of novel coronavirus infection aboard. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

U.S. Navy Capt. Brett Crozier was relieved of his command of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt on Thursday after he complained in a letter about the Navy's response to a shipboard outbreak of the coronavirus. U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy