David Welna David Welna is NPR's national security correspondent.
David Welna, photographed for NPR, 13 November 2019, in Washington DC.
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David Welna

A man checks to cast his ballot in Kenosha, Wis., on April 7. A new study suggests that in-person voting in that Wisconsin primary did not produce a surge of new coronavirus cases. Kamil Krzaczynski /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski /AFP via Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to reporters Thursday after meeting with members of the U.N. Security Council and calling for the restoration of sanctions against Iran. Mike Segar/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Segar/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Ninety-five percent of child care providers are women, and many are losing their jobs as the pandemic devastates the industry, the National Women's Law Center says. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

A purge at the U.S. Agency for Global Media has fueled concerns that broadcasters like Radio Free Europe will be turned into distributors of propaganda on behalf of the Trump administration. Michal Kamary/Associated Press hide caption

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Michal Kamary/Associated Press

Sue Gordon in 2017 as deputy national intelligence director. Office of the Director of National Intelligence via AP hide caption

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Office of the Director of National Intelligence via AP

Exclusive: After Quitting Last Year, Senior U.S. Intelligence Official Now Talks

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Defense Secretary Mark Esper, pictured last month, spoke with his Chinese counterpart Thursday amid strained relations between the two countries. Michael Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/AP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows Thursday in front of a memorial to people who were killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing Raising New Questions 75 Years Later

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President Donald Trump chats with reporters Friday as he heads to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House. The day before, he floated the idea of delaying the election, prompting criticism from the Federalist Society's co-founder. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A statue of Robert E. Lee and busts of other Confederate leaders have been removed from the Virginia Capitol in Richmond, shown here in January. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, with President Trump and Defense Secretary Mark Esper during a ceremony to establish the U.S. Space Command last summer. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP