John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Beefed-Up Border Security Proposal Unsettles Texas Business Leaders

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As an Army chaplain in Iraq, David Peters administered last rites and grieved with survivors. When he came home, he says, he "fell apart emotionally and spiritually." Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers

An Army Chaplain, First Tested By War, Finds His Faith Renewed

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Child Migrant Crisis Stemmed By Border Security Build-Up

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Cuba is 90 miles away from the southernmost point in the United States, in Key West, Fla. "There used to be a ferry that ran between the two islands every day," says 89-year-old Gregorio Garcia, who emigrated in 1958. "I hope they operate it again someday." Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

For Cubans In Key West, A Longing To Fill In 'Gaps Of Who We Are'

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Businesses Buzz With Anticipation In Wake Of U.S.-Cuba Thaw

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In Miami, Mixed Emotions Over Release Of Cuban Spies

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Border Patrol Completes Recruitment Drive Aimed At Women

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Maria Isabel de la Paz, a U.S. citizen, was twice turned away when trying to enter the U.S. legally. When she attempted an illegal crossing, her case was decided by a Border Patrol agent, not an immigration judge. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Born In The U.S. But Turned Back At The Border, Time After Time

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Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Legal Pot In The U.S. May Be Undercutting Mexican Marijuana

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Do More Boots On The Border Equal Security?

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Viewers React Differently To Obama's Immigration Address

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The largest immigration detention center in the nation has just broken ground in Dilley, Texas. Some 2,400 women and children will be held in modular buildings and deported if their asylum claims fail. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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How Will A Small Town In Arizona Manage An ICE Facility In Texas?

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Children enter a dormitory in the Artesia Family Residential Center in Artesia, N.M, in September. The center has been held up by the Obama administration as an example of the crackdown on illegal crossings from Central America. But civil rights advocates are suing the federal government, saying that lack of access to legal representation turned the center into a "deportation mill." Juan Carlos LLorca/AP hide caption

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Juan Carlos LLorca/AP

Immigrant Advocates Challenge The Way Mothers Are Detained

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Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

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jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr