John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Poaching is rife in Tanzania game reserves. This elephant was killed, and its tusks taken, at the Lake Chala Safari Camp, a small, private reserve near Mount Kilimanjaro in northern Tanzania. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

In A Tanzanian Village, Elephant Poachers Thrive

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Tanzania has been identified as the leading exporter of illegal ivory in recent years. An estimated 10,000 elephants are being slaughtered in the country annually. Here, elephants walk in the Serengeti National Reserve in northern Tanzania in 2010. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

Poachers Decimate Tanzania's Elephant Herds

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Somalis chat at a beach-side restaurant earlier this month. After two decades of civil war, Somali's capital, Mogadishu, is beginning to recover. Feisal Omar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Feisal Omar/Reuters/Landov

As Somalia's War Ebbs, Mogadishu Dares To Rebuild

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A Big Texan Reflects On 'Big Tex'

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In 1991, the Batwa forest people of Uganda were evicted from their land when two neighboring national parks were created to protect shrinking habitat for the endangered mountain gorilla. A new program is trying to help them earn money and reconnect with their roots. Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR hide caption

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Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, who has ruled since 1986, speaks in January at Uganda's Makarere University in the capital Kampala. Uganda celebrates a half-century of independence next month, and Museveni has ruled for more than half of that time. Ronald Kabuubi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Kabuubi/AFP/Getty Images

Uganda's Leader: 26 Years In Power, No Plans To Quit

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Patrick Karabaranga, a warden at the Virunga National Park, plays with an orphaned mountain gorilla at the park headquarters in Rumangabo, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, on July 17. The Virunga park is home to about 200 mountain gorillas, approximately a quarter of the world's population. Phil Moore/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Moore/AFP/Getty Images

The eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo has been ravaged by rebel groups for years. A new faction, the March 23 Movement, or M23, already controls a large area, and there are fears this could ignite another war. Here M23 fighters go out on a patrol. Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR hide caption

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Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR

Yet Again, Congo Faces The Specter Of Civil War

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Sauti Sol has become the most popular band in Kenya. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Sauti Sol: Native Sons Sing Straight To Kenya's Youth

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Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich wins the gold medal in the men's marathon at the 2012 London Olympics. As the impoverished country's second gold medalist in 40 years, Kiprotich became an instant national hero. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

South African Police Accused Of Massacring Miners

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A man from the Mundari nomad tribe stands among cattle on Jan. 18, in Juba, South Sudan. Cattle raids, a common occurrence in the region, have grown increasingly violent in recent years. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

In South Sudan, Cows Are Cash And Source Of Friction

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Summer Nights: Cuban 'Jubans' In South Sudan

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Alice Njeri found work, and her 10-year-old son Mike — who is physically and mentally disabled — received therapy and other services at a community center in Maai Mahiu, outside Nairobi, Kenya. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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