John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

John Burnett

Do More Boots On The Border Equal Security?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/367244332/367244333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Viewers React Differently To Obama's Immigration Address

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/365638362/365638363" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The largest immigration detention center in the nation has just broken ground in Dilley, Texas. Some 2,400 women and children will be held in modular buildings and deported if their asylum claims fail. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

How Will A Small Town In Arizona Manage An ICE Facility In Texas?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/359411980/359512122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Children enter a dormitory in the Artesia Family Residential Center in Artesia, N.M, in September. The center has been held up by the Obama administration as an example of the crackdown on illegal crossings from Central America. But civil rights advocates are suing the federal government, saying that lack of access to legal representation turned the center into a "deportation mill." Juan Carlos LLorca/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Carlos LLorca/AP

Immigrant Advocates Challenge The Way Mothers Are Detained

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356419939/356451458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr

As Oil Prices Slide, Speculation Rises On Shale Boom's Sustainability

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356045110/356045111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Texas City Unveils Statue Of Innocent Man Who Died In Prison

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/349464121/349464122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Agents at the Air and Marine Operations Center at an Air Force Reserve base in Riverside, Calif., track 20,000 to 25,000 flights a day for suspicious activity. Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC hide caption

toggle caption
Master Sgt. Julie Avey/AMOC

Keeping Watch On America's Vertical Borders

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/349008566/349192761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 350 towns and cities in Texas have banned new billboards, but billboards companies are still pressing for new and taller signs. John Burnett hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett

In Cities Across Texas, Activists Battle Billboard Companies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/346153394/346299218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Settlement, Homeland Security Agrees To Reform 'Voluntary Departures'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/343758290/343797126" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pamela Taylor, who lives near Brownsville, Texas, calls the border fence there "useless." John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

In South Texas, Few On The Fence Over Divisive Border Wall Issue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340628014/341283414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thanks to unusually heavy monsoon rains, mesa land east of Ghost Ranch in New Mexico has erupted into vibrant green life — an unusual sight in this region. courtesy Harvey Day hide caption

toggle caption
courtesy Harvey Day

New Mexico's Northern Landscape Gets A New Burst Of Color

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/338639799/339082082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Texas Borderland, Security Is No Simple Goal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/338639699/338639700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands of young immigrants, many of them from Central America, have crossed illegally into the United States this year, causing an unprecedented humanitarian crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Amid Wave Of Child Immigrants, Reports Of Abuse By Border Patrol

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/334041633/334851624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript