John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

A still from the video game Call of Juarez: The Cartel. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Mexican police guard the U.S. vehicle that was attacked Tuesday by suspected drug traffickers in Santa Maria del Rio, Mexico. One U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent was killed and another was wounded. El Pulso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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El Pulso/AFP/Getty Images

Crime-scene barrier tape is seen at the University of Texas at Austin after a gunman opened fire and then killed himself in September. Such incidents prompted lawmakers in the state to push legislation removing "premises of higher education" as gun-free zones. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

The production begins with 200 people in the stands, and then in come Mary and Joseph. Above, a shepherd stands with a llama. Courtesy of George Barnett hide caption

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Courtesy of George Barnett

Each year, composer Robert Kyr travels to the secluded Monastery of Christ in the Desert, in New Mexico, to write his music. Karen Kuehn hide caption

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Karen Kuehn

Hear "Santa Fe Vespers" by Robert Kyr, performed by the Santa Fe Desert Chorale

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The Juarez Symphony produces more operas per year than any city in Mexico besides the capital. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Amid Unrest, Juarez Symphony Orchestra Plays On

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A Mexican soldier patrols the tunnel discovered on Thanksgiving Day at a warehouse in Tijuana. Francisco Vega/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Vega/AFP/Getty Images

Drug Tunnel Discovery Signals New Cartel In Town

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This photo, provided by a resident of Ciudad Mier who did not want to be identified, shows a burned-out police station in the town. A brutal turf war between the Gulf Cartel and the Zetas drug gang has led to an evacuation of the Mexican border town. hide caption

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Drug War Forces Residents To Flee Mexican Town

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U.S. Border Patrol agents patrol the Rio Grande River, passing under the World Trade Bridge. Every 15 seconds one truck crosses the eight-lane bridge, which connects Laredo, Texas with the Mexican border town of Nuevo Laredo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Antonio Ezequiel Cardenas Guillen, also known as "Tony Tormenta," was killed Friday in a shootout with soldiers in Mexico. Drug Enforcement Administration/Getty Images hide caption

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Drug Enforcement Administration/Getty Images

Mexican Border Lake Shooting Still Awash In Mystery

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