John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Leaving Behind The Cartel's 'Songs Of Death'

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A woman uses a cash machine at an HSBC bank office in Mexico City. The multi-national bank was heavily penalized several years ago for permitting huge transfers of drug cartel money between Mexico and the U.S. Enric Marti/AP hide caption

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Enric Marti/AP

Awash In Cash, Drug Cartels Rely On Big Banks To Launder Profits

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Many drug cartel members die young, and when they do, their families often spend lavishly to construct mausoleums that look like small condos. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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At The Border, The Drugs Go North And The Cash Goes South

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Claudia Rosales kneels in front of her home altar devoted to Santa Muerte, or Saint Death. Rosales put up a statue of the saint in the city that was taken down by the mayor of Matamoros. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

'Saint Death' Now Revered On Both Sides Of U.S.-Mexico Frontier

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Pastor Jamie Coots holds a snake at Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church in Middlesboro, Ky., last year. NGO hide caption

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NGO

For Snake-Handling Preacher, 10th Bite Proves Fatal

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SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft atop rocket Falcon 9 lifts off from Cape Canaveral in Florida in May 2012. The launch made SpaceX the first commercial company to send a spacecraft to the International Space Station. Roberto Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Gonzalez/Getty Images

Jess Escalante (right), the 70-year-old founder of Mariachi Norteno, plays his guitarrón in a recent Mass for Our Lady of Guadalupe inside St. Joseph Catholic Church in Houston. He's joined by Jose Martinez. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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'Our Soul Music Is Mariachi Music': Houston's Mexican Mass

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In his music, Josh Garrels says, he tries to "peel back layers" of what it means to be a Christian. Sasha Arutyunova/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sasha Arutyunova/Courtesy of the artist

A Christian Musician With More Questions Than Answers

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Taylor Muse (front), lead singer of the Austin indie-rock band Quiet Company, says the group is ready to be seen as more than just "the atheist band." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

For An Ex-Christian Rocker, Faith Lost Is A Following Gained

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John Brown, the head of Zion Oil & Gas, believes the Bible will help him find oil in Israel. The company, which is listed on Nasdaq, has so far spent $130 million and drilled four dry holes. Brown is shown here at one of the company's drilling rigs in Israel. Courtesy of Zion Oil hide caption

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Courtesy of Zion Oil

Drilling For Oil, Based On The Bible: Do Oil And Religion Mix?

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Kanniks Kannikeswaran leads the Greater Cincinnati Indian Community Choir in 2012, as it competes at the World Choir Games in Cincinnati. Courtesy of Kanniks Kannikeswaran hide caption

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Courtesy of Kanniks Kannikeswaran

Todd Fadel, at piano, leads singers at a recent gathering of Beer & Hymns at First Christian Church Portland. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

To Stave Off Decline, Churches Attract New Members With Beer

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Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis performs his Abyssinian Mass in 2008. Frank Stewart/Jazz at Lincoln Center hide caption

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Frank Stewart/Jazz at Lincoln Center