John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Bloqueadas por una cerca con acceso para transeúntes, las aguas de inundación de Headquarters Wash cerca de Lukeville, Arizona, fluyeron a lo largo de la cerca hasta el control fronterizo mexicano de Sonoyta, Sonora, en 2008. Walt Frerck/AP hide caption

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Walt Frerck/AP

A view from the International bridge between Presidio, Texas, and Ojinaga, Mexico, shows the flooded checkpoint between the two cities on Sept. 17, 2008. A levee broke and water from the Rio Grande inundated parts of the city with 10 feet of water. Walt Frerck/AP hide caption

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Walt Frerck/AP

Mexico Worries That A New Border Wall Will Worsen Flooding

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Johnny Nicholas, the owner of the Hilltop Cafe, books a dinner concert in the dining room once a month. The bluesman and his wife opened the restaurant in 1980. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Both The Food And The Music Are Made From Scratch At This Texas Joint

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Hiro Yazawa of Japan Cell displays a spotlight weapon that sells for $5,000 at the Border Security Expo in San Antonio on Tuesday. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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With Trump's Border Plans, Security And Surveillance Firms Eye Bigger Profits

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Border Security Takes Spotlight At Annual Industry Meeting

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An immigration detainee stands near a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) grievance box last month in the high security unit at the Theo Lacy Facility, a county jail in Orange, Calif., that also houses immigration detainees arrested by ICE. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spotlight On Migrant Crimes Drums Up Support For Trump's Immigration Dragnet

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Trump Administration Ratchets Up Pressure On Sanctuary Cities

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Government Outlines Details For Border Wall Proposals

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An El Salvadoran child is interviewed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent after crossing the Rio Grande from Mexico into the U.S. to seek asylum on Apr. 14, 2016, in Roma, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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In Their Search For Asylum, Central Americans Find The U.S. Is Closing Its Doors

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Deportees From The North, Migrants From The South Overwhelm Mexican Border City

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This privately owned land along the southern border was bisected by a fence a decade ago. The owner, O.D. Emery, still supports the fence. Ravenna Koenig/NPR hide caption

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On Both Sides Of The Mexican Border, Fear Grows For U.S.-Bound Migrants

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Piro Garcia's employees — like this one — are struggling to keep his two taco trucks open without their owner, who is awaiting deportation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Piro's Taco Trucks Are Beloved. Now He Is Facing Deportation

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The Call-In: Crossing The U.S.-Mexico Border

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Eloisa Tamez received $56,000 from the federal government for a quarter-acre of her ancestral land, but she says, "I wasn't looking for the money. I don't want to lose the land. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Landowners Likely To Bring More Lawsuits As Trump Moves On Border Wall

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