John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

John Burnett

Trump Calls For New Restrictions On Asylum-Seekers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/718735338/718735365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Couy Griffin, chairman of the Otero County Board of Commissioners, stands at the Border Patrol's abandoned U.S. Route 70 checkpoint in New Mexico. The Border Patrol checkpoints have been shutdown in the El Paso Sector as agents have been diverted to deal with an influx of immigrants. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

New Mexico County Declares Local Emergency Over Abandoned Border Patrol Checkpoints

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/717299664/717310390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New Mexico County Declares State Of Emergency Over Abandoned Checkpoints

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/717246076/717246077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Edgar Baltazar Garcia's wife, Jennifer Garcia, holds a photo of her husband from when he was deployed at Balad Air Base in Iraq as a turret gunner in a Humvee. He now faces deportation to Mexico over a felony conviction. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

After Felony Conviction, Iraq War Veteran Faces Deportation To Mexico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/714405597/716647679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arrest Fuels Debate Over Right-Wing Groups Who Patrol Southwest Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716258054/716258055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kirstjen Nielsen, then Homeland Security Secretary, testified on Capitol Hill before the House Homeland Security Committee in March. She said "cases of fake families are cropping up everywhere," among the surge of migrants at the Southern border. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

What's Next For Immigration As Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Leaves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711169809/711169811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some Central American migrants start their journey through Mexico at the Guatemalan border town of Gracias a Dios. Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Celia Talbot Tobin for NPR

How One Guatemalan Town Has Changed With The Flow Of Migrants Passing Through

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710398131/710398132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Latin America's Open Borders Encourage Migrants To Travel To The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709373929/709375961" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tekandi Paniagua, Guatemalan consul in Del Rio, Texas, says the price for fake documents ranges from $200 to $700. He says it's an additional service provided by organizations that work for human smugglers. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Fake Birth Certificates A Growing Problem Amid Migrant Family Surge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/708118129/708225212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fake Birth Certificates And 'Fake Families' Amid Migrant Surge At Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/708176435/708178647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrants trudge along the border fence to a waiting bus after turning themselves in to the Border Patrol at the U.S.-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

A Surge Of Migrants Strains Border Patrol As El Paso Becomes Latest Hot Spot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706583199/706636169" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Migrant Surge In El Paso Strains Border Patrol

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706686820/706692013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript