John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Lydia Mendoza Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Lydia Mendoza: The First Lady Of Tejano

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A Mexican soldier stands guard as a haul of marijuana and cocaine are incinerated in the background in November 2009. Fighting among the drug cartels — and between government forces and the cartels — has cost nearly 24,000 Mexican lives since late 2006. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

The Santa Fe bridge (shown in February 2010) links the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez (bottom) with the U.S. city of El Paso in Texas. American law enforcement officials say they are worried that violence from newly Sinaloa-controlled areas of Ciudad Juarez will spill over into the U.S. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

A U.S. Border Patrol agent parks beside the border fence at Fort Hancock, Texas. With fears rising that the drug violence in Mexico could spill into the U.S., Hudspeth County Sheriff Arvin West said at a town-hall meeting last week: "You farmers, I'm telling you right now, arm yourselves." LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Police unload packages of marijuana confiscated in January in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration estimates half of all Mexican marijuana is smuggled into the U.S. through South Texas. Two drug cartels are now fighting for control of the area. Raul Llamas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Llamas/AFP/Getty Images

Al Armendariz, the EPA's new regional administrator for Region 6, which includes Texas, speaks at a celebration of his appointment in Austin on Mardi Gras. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Officials Probe Austin Plane Crash

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Women mourn at a mass grave site Monday in Titanyen, Haiti. Many Haitians, who honor Voodoo death rituals, are upset by the mass burials. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

On the day of this interview, Lolo Beaubrun (right) had invited over three young musicians from a group called All Four Stars. Valentina Pasquali for NPR hide caption

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Valentina Pasquali for NPR

Lolo Beaubrun: A Voice Of Hope In Haiti

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