John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Two former teammates have accused cycling superstar Lance Armstrong of using illegal performance-enhancing drugs. Thao Nguyen/AP hide caption

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Thao Nguyen/AP

Et Tu, Austin? Locals Start To Doubt Lance Armstrong

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Members of the choral group Conspirare rehearse for the concert series "Renaissance and Response." Katie Hayes Luke hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke

Choral Marathon: Robert Kyr And His Singers Cross The Finish Line

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Hot Club of Cowtown's new album, What Makes Bob Holler, is a tribute to Western swing legend Bob Wills. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Hot Club Of Cowtown: A Texas Trio's Tribute

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Ken Terui, proprietor of Johnny's Jazz Cafe, shows off a tin of fruitcake sent to him by pianist Toshiko Akiyoshi. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Tsunami Spares Japan's Pine-Covered Islands

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Volunteers push a trolley filled with blankets destined for displaced people in the city of Kamaishi in Iwate prefecture. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Damaged homes stand in the debris at the tsunami-destroyed town of Yamada, Japan. The government will soon decide whether it will rebuild towns like Yamada or move residents elsewhere. Relocation, if it happens, will be hardest on the elderly. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

Naoki Sugawara, owner of Sugawara Autos in Morioka, can't find enough lightweight trucks to sell to fisherman who lost their vehicles to the tsunami. Chie Kobayashi/for NPR hide caption

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Chie Kobayashi/for NPR

Crisis Boosts Demand For Some Japanese Companies

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Bare foundation blocks are all that's left of Mitsue Murakami's Big Ocean Hotel after the tsunami ravaged the Pacific coast of Japan. Murakami, who is also a seaweed farmer, says everything was lost, but "we're trying very hard to overcome this hardship." John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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An unidentified man finds his smashed green jeep in the Miyako lot. He says he prefers his bicycle over his car, but he wanted to find his registration certificate and a chopping tool that was in the back seat. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Japan's Car Owners Search In Huge 'Graveyards'

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When a massive earthquake struck Japan on March 11, triggering a tsunami, the city of Rikuzentakata's famous pine trees were wiped away — except for this one. Now it is a symbol of hope for a devastated nation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Firefighters use heavy equipment to tear apart a collapsed 300-year-old house while searching for the dead in the rubble of Rikuzentakata, Japan. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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On Japan's Coast, A Search For Relatives And Relief

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