John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

John Burnett

Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480073262/480122119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sweetwater Jaycees surrounding rattlesnakes on Diamondback Day at the Texas state Capitol. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Amid Much Hissing, Texas Could Impose Ban To Rattle Snake Hunters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477694584/478040545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Karnes City, Texas, a temporary home for immigrant women and children detained at the border. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Concerns Over Mass Shootings Spark Rise In Concealed Carry Permits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473992268/473992291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Even as violent crime and property crime rates are falling, many Americans are choosing to arm themselves for safety reasons. RonBailey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
RonBailey/Getty Images

Does Carrying A Pistol Make You Safer?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473391286/473912262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mexican Candidates No Longer Have To Be Tied To Traditional Parties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473772697/473772698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Forrest Fenn's hidden treasure. Courtesy of Forrest Fenn hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Forrest Fenn

Seeking Adventure And Gold? Crack This Poem And Head Outdoors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469852983/470280428" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S., Canada Pledge To Lower Methane Emissions In Oil And Gas sectors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470040289/470040290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cubans' Free Ride After Crossing Into U.S. Riles Mexican-Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469005699/469005700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The West Kensington Ministry church in Philadelphia, seen here in 2014, is one of about a dozen churches offering sanctuary to Central American immigrants who are under deportation orders. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

U.S. Churches Offer Safe Haven For A New Generation Of Immigrants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466145280/466186384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Epic, founded in Austin, Texas, makes organic meat bars filled with nuts and dried fruit. It's a rising star in the beef jerky market and was recently acquired by General Mills. Courtesy of Epic hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Epic

Crazy For Jerky: An Ancient Trail Food Finds New Fans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463954925/465181016" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Open-carry supporters attend a rally earlier this month in Austin, Texas. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Texas' New Open-Carry Law Unpopular Among Some Gun Owners

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463184909/463224242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hilda Ramirez and her son, Ivan, are staying at a shelter home in Austin. They fear that Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents will come and arrest them any minute. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Central American Families Fear Deportation As Raids Begin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/462057211/462059854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Harmonica virtuoso Howard Levy found that by blowing a little too hard into his instrument, he could conjure notes it was never made to play. "And it freaked me out, I have to tell you," he says. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Pocket-Sized Revolution: Behind The Harmonica's World-Music Takeover

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460860955/461095921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript