John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

Every day at 9 a.m. sharp in Iten, Kenya, 200 or so runners — most of them unknowns hoping to become champions — train on the dirt roads surrounding the town. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

How Kenya Builds The Fastest Humans On Earth

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Kenya has made its public schools free, which has dramatically increased the number of students. But this has also led to overcrowding. Here, four boys share a desk and a single textbook at the Amboni Secondary School in central Kenya. Courtesy of Turk Pipkin hide caption

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Courtesy of Turk Pipkin

Kenya's Free Schools Bring A Torrent Of Students

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Receding water at Lake Travis near Austin, Texas, has the state concerned about its water supply. In 2011, Lake Travis had the lowest inflow since it was created about 70 years ago. Joshua Lott/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Reuters/Landov

Texas Seeks New Water Supplies Amid Drought

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Siblings Charles Hagood and Nancy Hagood Nunns grew up in Junction, Texas, in the 1950s. Charles says the drought drove ranchers to find other types of work. Michael O'Brien/Michael O'Brien hide caption

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Michael O'Brien/Michael O'Brien

Singers Deline Briscoe, Shellie Morris and Lou Bennett (pictured left to right) perform with Australia's Black Arm Band Company. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Aboriginal Musicians 'Band' Together To Expose Oppression

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David Sonnier Jr., from Jeanerette, La., plays the Devil in Angola Prison's production of The Life of Jesus Christ. He was convicted of aggravated rape and is serving a life sentence. Deborah Luster/for NPR hide caption

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Deborah Luster/for NPR

A Mexican federal policeman guards the area where dozens of bodies, some of them mutilated, were found on a highway outside the northern Mexican city of Monterrey on May 13. The murders were one of the latest episodes in Mexico's brutal and unrelenting drug war. Christian Palma/AP hide caption

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Christian Palma/AP

Mexicans Want New Approach To Bloody Drug War

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Mexican presidential front-runner Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, waves to the crowds during a campaign stop in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico, on June 3. The once dominant PRI, out of power for the past 12 years, looks likely to make a comeback. Alex Cossio/AP hide caption

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Alex Cossio/AP

Mexican Police Investigate Latest Atrocity

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A woman lights a candle during a tribute to slain Mexican journalists at the Monument of Independence in Mexico City on May 5. The vigil took place to protest violence against the press after the brutal murders of four journalists in Veracruz state. Sashenka Gutierrez/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Sashenka Gutierrez/EPA/Landov

In 2010, former inmate Ross Walton describes mistreatment he says inmates received from guards. Faced with a court order to reform the Walnut Grove juvenile prison, the company managing the prison is leaving Mississippi. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Miss. Prison Operator Out; Facility Called A 'Cesspool'

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A makeshift memorial pays tribute to Bobby Clark, one of the victims of a shooting spree that left three people dead and terrorized Tulsa's African-American community. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Tulsa Mourns Man Who 'Never Met A Stranger'

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Tulsa Shooting Suspect Had Troubled Past

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Gideon Shoes co-founder Matt Noffs with youth from The Street University, the nonprofit youth center that launched the fair trade company. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Lone Star Nation: Today, the Texas capitol flies both the American and Texas flags, but after independence the Lone Star flag would fly on its own. Steve Dunwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Dunwell/Getty Images