John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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John Burnett

The 65 black and white members of the Shades of Praise choir (Joe King Jr. sings here in 2006) have helped one another to raise money and find doctors, housing, schools and new churches. Evie Stone/NPR hide caption

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Evie Stone/NPR

Katrina And Three Tales Of Endurance

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A drilling platform is seen near the site where the Deepwater Horizon oil platform sank as work continues to contain the oil leak on May 9, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. A federal judge has blocked the Obama administration's six-month moratorium on deepwater drilling in the Gulf Of Mexico June 22, 2010. The White House announced that it will immediately appeal the ruling. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Despite Spill, Louisiana Remains Wedded To Oil

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Oil Imperils Native American Town, And Way Of Life

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The Chisos Mountains in Brewster County near Big Bend National Park, in 2006. Tom Alex/AP hide caption

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Tom Alex/AP

Lydia Mendoza Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images

Lydia Mendoza: The First Lady Of Tejano

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A Mexican soldier stands guard as a haul of marijuana and cocaine are incinerated in the background in November 2009. Fighting among the drug cartels — and between government forces and the cartels — has cost nearly 24,000 Mexican lives since late 2006. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

The Santa Fe bridge (shown in February 2010) links the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez (bottom) with the U.S. city of El Paso in Texas. American law enforcement officials say they are worried that violence from newly Sinaloa-controlled areas of Ciudad Juarez will spill over into the U.S. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

A U.S. Border Patrol agent parks beside the border fence at Fort Hancock, Texas. With fears rising that the drug violence in Mexico could spill into the U.S., Hudspeth County Sheriff Arvin West said at a town-hall meeting last week: "You farmers, I'm telling you right now, arm yourselves." LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP