John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

John Burnett

Patrick Karabaranga, a warden at the Virunga National Park, plays with an orphaned mountain gorilla at the park headquarters in Rumangabo, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, on July 17. The Virunga park is home to about 200 mountain gorillas, approximately a quarter of the world's population. Phil Moore/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Phil Moore/AFP/Getty Images

The eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo has been ravaged by rebel groups for years. A new faction, the March 23 Movement, or M23, already controls a large area, and there are fears this could ignite another war. Here M23 fighters go out on a patrol. Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR

Yet Again, Congo Faces The Specter Of Civil War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160739941/160829730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sauti Sol has become the most popular band in Kenya. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Sauti Sol: Native Sons Sing Straight To Kenya's Youth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160754266/160795794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich wins the gold medal in the men's marathon at the 2012 London Olympics. As the impoverished country's second gold medalist in 40 years, Kiprotich became an instant national hero. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kyodo/Landov

South African Police Accused Of Massacring Miners

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158972097/158972252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man from the Mundari nomad tribe stands among cattle on Jan. 18, in Juba, South Sudan. Cattle raids, a common occurrence in the region, have grown increasingly violent in recent years. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kyodo/Landov

In South Sudan, Cows Are Cash And Source Of Friction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158776225/158911372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Summer Nights: Cuban 'Jubans' In South Sudan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158448841/158449323" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alice Njeri found work, and her 10-year-old son Mike — who is physically and mentally disabled — received therapy and other services at a community center in Maai Mahiu, outside Nairobi, Kenya. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

A girl carries a bucket of potatoes as she walks with her brother to their small shack, on July 20 in Juba, South Sudan. After breaking away from Sudan last year, South Sudan recently celebrated it's first independence anniversary. Over the past year repeated conflict with North Sudan, corruption scandals and economic difficulties have plagued the new country. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

At Age One, A Tattered Reputation For South Sudan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157791705/157886532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Every day at 9 a.m. sharp in Iten, Kenya, 200 or so runners — most of them unknowns hoping to become champions — train on the dirt roads surrounding the town. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

How Kenya Builds The Fastest Humans On Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157503759/157527251" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kenya has made its public schools free, which has dramatically increased the number of students. But this has also led to overcrowding. Here, four boys share a desk and a single textbook at the Amboni Secondary School in central Kenya. Courtesy of Turk Pipkin hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Turk Pipkin

Kenya's Free Schools Bring A Torrent Of Students

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156840541/156873395" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Receding water at Lake Travis near Austin, Texas, has the state concerned about its water supply. In 2011, Lake Travis had the lowest inflow since it was created about 70 years ago. Joshua Lott/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua Lott/Reuters/Landov

Texas Seeks New Water Supplies Amid Drought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156366821/156385510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Siblings Charles Hagood and Nancy Hagood Nunns grew up in Junction, Texas, in the 1950s. Charles says the drought drove ranchers to find other types of work. Michael O'Brien/Michael O'Brien hide caption

toggle caption
Michael O'Brien/Michael O'Brien

Singers Deline Briscoe, Shellie Morris and Lou Bennett (pictured left to right) perform with Australia's Black Arm Band Company. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Aboriginal Musicians 'Band' Together To Expose Oppression

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156204104/156258599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript