John Burnett John Burnett is the Southwest Correspondent on the National Desk.
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

John Burnett

Allison Shelley/NPR
John Burnett at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

John Burnett

Southwest Correspondent, National Desk

John Burnett is a national correspondent based in Austin, Texas, who has been assigned a new beat for 2022—Polarized America—to explore all facets of our politically and culturally divided nation. Prior to this assignment, Burnett covered immigration, Southwest border affairs, Texas news and other national assignments. In 2018, 2019 and again in 2020, he won national Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio-Television News Directors Association for continuing coverage of the immigration beat. In 2020, Burnett along with other NPR journalists, were finalists for a duPont-Columbia Award for their coverage of the Trump Administration's Remain in Mexico program. In December 2018, Burnett was invited to participate in a workshop on Refugees, Immigration and Border Security in Western Europe, sponsored by the RIAS Berlin Commission.

Though he is assigned to the National Desk, his beat has sometimes stretched around the world.

He has filed stories from more than 30 countries since joining NPR in 1986. In 2012, he spent five months in Nairobi as the East Africa Correspondent, followed by a stint during 2013 as the network's religion reporter. His special reporting projects have included working in New Orleans during and after Hurricane Katrina, as an embedded reporter with the First Marine Division during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and continuing coverage of the U.S. drug war in the Americas. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Burnett's 2008 groundbreaking four-part series "Dirty Money"—which examined how law enforcement agencies have gotten hooked on and, in some cases, corrupted by seized drug money—won three national awards: a Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for Investigative Reporting, a Sigma Delta Chi Society of Professional Journalists Award for Investigative Reporting, and an Edward R. Murrow Award for the accompanying website. His 2007 three-part series "The Forgotten War," which took a critical look at the nation's 30-year war on drugs, won a Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Problems.

In 2006, Burnett's memoir, Uncivilized Beasts & Shameless Hellions: Travels with an NPR Correspondent, was published by Rodale Press. In that year, he also served as an Ethics Fellow at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida.

In 2004, Burnett won a national Edward R. Murrow Award for investigative reporting for his story on the accidental U.S. bombing of an Iraqi village. His work was singled out by judges for the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award honoring the network's overall coverage of the Iraq War. Also in 2003, Burnett won a first place National Headliner Award for investigative reporting about corruption among federal immigration agents on the U.S.-Mexico border.

In the months following the attacks of September 11, Burnett reported from New York City, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. His reporting contributed to coverage that won the Overseas Press Club Award and an Alfred I. duPont Columbia University Award.

In 2001, Burnett reported and produced a one-hour documentary, "The Oil Century," for KUT-FM in Austin, which won a silver prize at the New York Festivals. He was a visiting faculty member in broadcast journalism at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in 2002 and 1997. He received a Ford Foundation Grant in 1997 for a special series on sustainable development in Latin America.

Burnett's favorite stories are those that reveal a hidden reality. He recalls happening upon Carlos Garcia, a Mexico City street musician who plays a musical leaf, a chance encounter that brought a rare and beautiful art form to a national audience. In reporting his series "Fraud Down on the Farm," Burnett spent nine months investigating the abuse of the United States crop insurance system and shining light on surprising stories of criminality.

Abroad, his report on the accidental U.S. Air Force bombing of the Iraqi village of Al-Taniya, an event that claimed 31 lives, helped listeners understand the fog of war. His "Cocaine Republics" series in 2004 was one of the first accounts to detail the emergence of Central America as a major drug smuggling region. But many listeners remember the audio postcard he filed while on assignment in Peshawar, Pakistan, after 9/11 about what it was like being, at six-foot-seven, the "tallest American at a Death-to-Americarally."

Prior to coming to NPR, Burnett was based in Guatemala City for United Press International covering the Central America civil wars. From 1979-1983, he was a general assignment reporter for various Texas newspapers.

Burnett graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Story Archive

The deaths of migrants in San Antonio has put a spotlight on the immigration issue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108717888/1108717905" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

51 immigrants are dead in the worst known human smuggling catastrophe in modern U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1108387068/1108387069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sam Collins poses for a portrait at Reedy Chapel-AME Church. Michael Starghill, Jr. for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Starghill, Jr. for NPR

The new Juneteenth federal holiday traces its roots to Galveston, Texas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105911785/1106256095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People take pictures next to a mural during a Juneteenth celebration in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 2021. Last year, the U.S. designated Juneteenth a federal holiday with President Joe Biden urging Americans "to learn from our history." Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Cody Patton, superintendent of Harrold Schools. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

A tiny Texas school district 'in the middle of nowhere' is arming half its staff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104177659/1104399764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Retired pastor Julián Moreno, 80, lost his great-granddaugther during the Robb Elementary School shooting. Patricia Lim/KUT hide caption

toggle caption
Patricia Lim/KUT

A former pastor grieves the loss of his great-granddaughter in Uvalde

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101960044/1101973294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police officers walk past a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Thursday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

The Uvalde shooting renews questions about school security

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101921388/1101921389" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Encore: The United States' only native parrot is being studied, to save it

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101570021/1101570022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How the elementary school shooting is impacting the Uvalde community

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101307672/1101307679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

West Hansen's role is to inform people of the government benefits and services they can access, including the coronavirus vaccine. But many of his clients distrust the needle. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

The number of Americans who say they won't get a COVID shot hasn't budged in a year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091053850/1099244642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of two abortion drugs available without a prescription in some Mexican drugstores. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Mexican border town sees an increase in sales of abortion drugs to women from the U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097210654/1097637174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Texas' abortion law led some to get abortion pills in Mexico, with grim consequences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097261242/1097261243" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amid lawsuits over Sandy Hook shooting denial, InfoWars files for bankruptcy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093477431/1093477432" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript