Wade Goodwyn Wade Goodwyn is a NPR National Desk Correspondent covering Texas and the surrounding states.
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Wade Goodwyn

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Wade Goodwyn at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Wade Goodwyn

Correspondent, National Desk, Dallas

Wade Goodwyn is an NPR National Desk Correspondent covering Texas and the surrounding states.

Reporting since 1991, Goodwyn has covered a wide range of issues, from mass shootings and hurricanes to Republican politics. Whatever it might be, Goodwyn covers the national news emanating from the Lone Star State.

Though a journalist, Goodwyn really considers himself a storyteller. He grew up in a Southern storytelling family and tradition, he considers radio an ideal medium for narrative journalism. While working for a decade as a political organizer in New York City, he began listening regularly to WNYC, which eventually led him to his career as an NPR reporter.

In a recent profile, Goodwyn's voice was described as being "like warm butter melting over BBQ'd sweet corn." But he claims, dubiously, that his writing is just as important as his voice.

Goodwyn is a graduate of the University of Texas with a degree in history. He lives in Dallas with his famliy.

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Story Archive

The late opinion journalist Molly Ivins, a syndicated columnist and public speaker, is the subject of the new documentary film Raise Hell. Robert Bedell/Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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Robert Bedell/Magnolia Pictures

A Portrait Of Molly Ivins, Maverick Texas Journalist, In 'Raise Hell'

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Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger fatally shot an unarmed black neighbor whose apartment she said she entered by mistake, believing it to be her own. AP hide caption

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AP

Jury Selection Begins For Ex-Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

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Jury Selection Begins In Trial Of Former Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Neighbor

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Jury Selection Begins For Ex-Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

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The Mapping Memory exhibition at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas, displays maps made in the late 1500s of what is now Mexico. They were created by indigenous peoples to help Spanish invaders map occupied lands. This watercolor and ink map of Meztitlán was made in 1579 by Gabriel de Chavez. Blanton Museum of Art hide caption

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Blanton Museum of Art

440 Years Old And Filled With Footprints, These Aren't Your Everyday Maps

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Ransomware crime is many times more lucrative than bank robbery, with practically no risk of getting caught. Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Ransomware Attacks Create Dilemma For Cities: Pay Up Or Resist?

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Southwest Airlines Network Operations Center is the heart and mind of the largest domestic carrier in the country, with a 4,000-flight dance card every day. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Wade Goodwyn/NPR

A Whole Lot Of Improv: Southwest Readjusts To A World Without The Boeing 737 Max

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Poll Shows Travelers Still Fear 737 Max As Boeing Tries To Get It Back In The Air

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Sandra Bland Recorded Her Own Video Of The 2015 Traffic Stop Arrest

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Mike Hollinger of IBM joined a group of business leaders at a news conference on the steps of the capitol in Austin, Texas. The business leaders oppose the so-called religious refusal laws currently under consideration in the Texas legislature. Susan Risdon/Red Media Group hide caption

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Susan Risdon/Red Media Group

Business Leaders Oppose 'License To Discriminate' Against LGBT Texans

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According to a researcher hired by the Boy Scouts of America to review internal files, more than 12,000 children have been sexually assaulted while participating in its programs. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Abuse By Boy Scout Leaders More Widespread Than Earlier Thought

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Boy Scouts Of America Estimates More Than 12,000 Victims Of Sexual Abuse

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Convicted killer John William King is escorted from the Jasper County Courthouse in 1999 after being found guilty of capital murder in the dragging death of James Byrd Jr. King was executed Wednesday evening. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Texas Executes Man Convicted In 1998 Murder Of James Byrd Jr.

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