Larry Abramson Larry Abramson is NPR's National Security Correspondent.
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The U.S. Air Force could retire the A-10 "Warthog," despite support for the plane from infantrymen and pilots. These types of clashes occur whenever the military tries to mothball a weapon. Staff Sgt. Melanie Norman/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Melanie Norman/U.S. Air Force

Karzai's Political Games Overshadow Hagel's Visit To Afghanistan

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Avoiding Another Government Shutdown Moves To Front Burner

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U.S. Flies Bombers Through East China Sea Air Space China Claims

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This colorfully illustrated French and Hebrew Passover Haggadah was published in Vienna in 1930. Caption on the image: "Eating Matzah." This restored document is part of an exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., that opens Nov. 8. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

The Pentagon extended military benefits to same-sex spouses this summer, but some states have been resisting. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called that resistance "wrong" on Thursday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Cell towers are constantly tracking the location of mobile phones. And that data, federal courts have ruled, is not constitutionally protected. Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Steve Greer/iStockphoto.com

Who Has The Right To Know Where Your Phone Has Been?

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At the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., the graduating class has been about 16 percent female since the institution first accepted women more than 30 years ago. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP