Margot Adler Margot Adler is a NPR correspondent based in NPR's New York Bureau. Her reports can be heard regularly on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.
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Margot Adler

Cities Vary Widely In Response To Occupy Camps

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How Are Business Impacted By Occupy Wall Street?

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The view from Madonna's former room at the Chelsea Hotel, where she lived after coming to New York in the early 1980s. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Anthony Grecco (from left) was discharged because of "don't ask, don't tell" and plans to re-enlist. Sue Fulton, a West Point graduate and former Army captain, now leads an organization of gay West Point graduates. Rob Smith says he left the Army because it was difficult living under the policy. Margot Adler/NPR hide caption

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Police officers watch travelers at the entrance of the Grand Central subway terminal in New York on Thursday. Security measures around the city were increased two days before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Margot Adler and her son, Alex Gliedman-Adler, at the cemetery at the Zentralfriedhof, where her famous grandfather was buried. Alfred Adler, the "Founder of Individual Psychology," died in 1937. Margot Adler hide caption

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Margot Adler

On Life And Ideas: A Relative's Ashes Reclaimed

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Seamstresses sew wedding dresses at Kleinfeld Bridal, one of the world's largest bridal emporiums. Brides who call because of the new law probably won't have an appointment for another month. Margot Adler/NPR hide caption

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New York City Anticipates Gay-Wedding Boom

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Edward Barnard (left) and Ken Chaya look at their map of Central Park as they stand in its North Woods. Margot Adler hide caption

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Margot Adler

Mapping (Almost) Every Tree In Central Park

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New York City. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The annual Gay Pride parade works its way along Christopher Street in Greenwich Village on Sunday. The parade became a victory celebration after New York's historic decision to legalize same-sex marriage. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP