Greg Allen Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features.
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Greg Allen

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Greg Allen at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

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A candlelight vigil was held last year for the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Seventeen students died in one of the worst school shootings in U.S. history. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Suicides In Parkland Leave Community In Shock

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Nouman Raja (center) stands with his defense team at his trial in West Palm Beach, Fla. Raja, a former Palm Beach Gardens police officer, was convicted for shooting and killing stranded motorist Corey Jones in 2015. Lannis Waters/AP hide caption

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'Today We Have Justice' — Florida Police Officer Convicted In 2015 Shooting

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Former Florida Police Officer Convicted In Shooting Death Of Black Man

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Fla. Gov. DeSantis Takes A Conservative Approach To Controversial Issues

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis won the race for governor in part because he billed himself a 'Trump Republican." But since becomiing governor, he is redefining what it means to be a Trump-styled conservative in the Sunshine State. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Florida's New Governor Redefines What It Means To Be A Trump Republican

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Researcher Michael Black's ashes were wrapped in the Virginia state flag before being dropped into the eye of Hurricane Michael. Black helped pioneer the use of a device dropped into hurricanes to measure wind speed and air pressure. Courtesy NOAA hide caption

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Courtesy NOAA

NOAA Researcher's Ashes Were Dropped Into The Eye Of Hurricane Michael

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Ashes Of Pioneering Meteorologist Were Scattered Into Hurricane Michael

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Trump Delivers Speech In Miami, Continuing Support For Venezuelan Opposition Leader

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Parkland Community Remembers Victims Of Deadly High School Shooting A Year Later

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One Year After Deadly Shooting, Parkland Parents Call For School Board Changes

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Debris litters Tyndall Air Force Base following Hurricane Michael in October 2018. Now the Air Force is rebuilding the base to be more resistant to future storms. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Tyndall Air Force Base, Hit By Hurricane Michael, Resumes More Operations

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Thousands of people watch as the temple by renowned Burning Man artist Best is set ablaze on March 21, 2015, in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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To Honor Parkland Victims, David Best Is Building A Temple, Then Setting It On Fire

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