Greg Allen As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast.
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Greg Allen

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Greg Allen at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and environmental stories. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the front lines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm arrived and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

More recently, he played key roles in NPR's reporting in 2018 on the devastation caused on Florida's panhandle by Hurricane Michael and on the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, as well as the state's important role in the 2008 and 2016 presidential elections. He's produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has been with NPR for three decades as an editor, executive producer, and correspondent.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. Prior to that, Allen spent a decade at NPR's Morning Edition. As editor and senior editor, he oversaw developing stories and interviews, helped shape the program's editorial direction, and supervised the program's staff.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990. His radio career includes working an independent producer and as a reporter/producer at NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. He began his career at WXPN-FM as a student, and there he was a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, and live and recorded music.

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Pandemic Overwhelms New York City's System For Handling Its Dead

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Englewood Beach in Charlotte County, Fla., was crowded on March 20. Public gatherings like these will be prohibited in Florida beginning Thursday. Thomas O'Neill/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas O'Neill/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Holland America's cruise ship Zaandam navigates through the Panama Canal on Sunday. Passengers and crew, some of whom may have COVID-19, have been stranded on the ship while looking for a country to accept them. Luis Acosta/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP via Getty Images

Cruise Ships With Possible COVID-19 Cases Have No Places To Dock

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Without A Statewide Stay-At-Home Mandate, Florida Braces For COVID-19 Wave

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Some Beaches Close To Heed Coronavirus Restrictions

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The moon, in its waning gibbous state, rises near the Jupiter Lighthouse in 2013, in Jupiter, Fla. The 108-feet tall, brick structure was first lit in 1860. The lighthouse sits atop a Native American archaeological site, which is at risk from the rising sea level. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Protecting And Preserving Ancient Sites At Risk From Sea-Level Rise In Florida

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