Greg Allen Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features.
Doby Photography /NPR
Greg Allen 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the frontlines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm hit and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, the state's important role in the 2008 presidential election and has produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has spent more than three decades in radio news, the first ten as a reporter in Ohio and Philadelphia and the last as an editor, producer and reporter at NPR.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. As executive producer he handled the day-to-day operations of the program as well as developed and produced remote broadcasts with live audiences and special breaking news coverage. He was with Talk of the Nation from 2000 to 2002.

Prior to that position, Allen spent three years as a senior editor for NPR's Morning Edition, developing stories and interviews, shaping the program's editorial direction, and supervising the program's staff. In 1993, he started a four year stint as an editor with Morning Edition just after working as Morning Edition's swing editor, providing editorial and production supervision in the early morning hours. Allen also worked for a time as the editor of NPR's National Desk.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990.

His radio career includes serving as the producer of Freedom's Doors Media Project — five radio documentaries on immigration in American cities that was distributed through NPR's Horizons series — frequent freelance work with NPR, Monitor Radio, Voice of America, and WHYY-FM, and work as a reporter/producer of NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. As a student and after graduation, Allen worked at WXPN-FM, the public radio station on campus, as a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, live and recorded music.

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Story Archive

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Students Weigh In On School's New Security Measures

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At Coquina Beach, crews are out early using beach rakes to clear dead fish. The fish are dying because of a toxic algae bloom known as red tide. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Florida's Gulf Coast Battles Deadly And Smelly Red Tide

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Florida Man Charged With Manslaughter In Fatal Parking Lot Shooting

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This image taken from surveillance video released by the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office, shows Markeis McGlockton (far left) and Michael Drejka involved in an altercation in a convenience store parking lot in Clearwater, Fla., last week. Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP

A picture taken in April shows sargassum seaweed on the French Caribbean Island of Guadeloupe. Helene Valenzuela /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Masses Of Seaweed Threaten Fisheries And Foul Beaches

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As much as 90 percent of Lake Okeechobee — one of the largest lakes in the U.S. — is covered with algae. The Everglades Foundation in South Florida where the lake is located decided to create a contest with a prize of $10 million for whomever develops a technology that cheaply removes phosphorus, the main culprit in algae blooms, from freshwater bodies. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Figure Out How To Cheaply Fix Algae Blooms And Win $10 Million

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More than 150,000 Floridians had their voting rights restored during former Gov. Charlie Crist's four years in office. In the seven years since then, current Gov. Rick Scott has approved restoring voting rights to just over 3,000 people. VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images hide caption

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Felons In Florida Want Their Voting Rights Back Without A Hassle

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Zillow Data Used To Project Impact Of Sea Level Rise On Real Estate

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NOAA's GOES satellite shows Hurricane Irma as it moved toward the Florida Coast in the Caribbean Sea on Sept. 07, 2017. Irma was a Category 5 hurricane, and in its aftermath, some people want a Category 6. NOAA /Getty Images hide caption

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NOAA /Getty Images

Some Survivors Of Category 5 Hurricane Irma Want A Category 6

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott joined a January event on the ongoing relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Maria in Florida and Puerto Rico. With a growing bloc of voters from the island in Florida, the Republican Scott and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson have been attacking each other over the issue of relief efforts in Puerto Rico in their high-stakes Senate campaign. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

At Issue In Florida Senate Campaign: Who's Fighting For Puerto Rico?

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Relocated Puerto Rican Voters Will Play A Big Role In Fla. Senate Race

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Graduating Seniors In Parkland, Fla., Hear From Jimmy Fallon

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A Virgin Islands National Park Struggles To Recover From Hurricanes

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People are living in homes where roofs, windows, even walls are missing, using blue tarps to keep the elements at bay. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Virgin Islands Still Recovering From 2017 Hurricanes As New Season Begins

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