Greg Allen As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast.
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Trainers (from left) Joe Sanchez, Brian Faulkner and Kelly Aldrich work with orcas Trua (front to back) Kayla and Nalani during the "Believe" show in Shamu Stadium at the Aquatica by SeaWorld theme park in Orlando, Fla., in 2011. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

SeaWorld Agrees To End Captive Breeding Of Killer Whales

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A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded

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Nuclear Plant Threatens Miami-Dade's Water. Mayor Says, 'This Isn't Flint'

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Blue skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico belie the U.S. territory's struggle with massive debt. The islands have a generous health care program that covers nearly everyone, but economists say it has never been adequately funded. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Puerto Rico's Growing Financial Crisis Threatens Health Care, Too

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Mosquito larvae fill the cup of stale water that entomologist Luis Hernandez dips from a stack of old tires in a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico Races To Stop Zika's Mosquitoes Before Rains Begin

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Previous experience with dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico has shown that even small amounts of standing water — as in the vases of cemeteries — can serve as breeding areas for the mosquitoes that carry dengue and Zika. Pan American Health Organization/Flickr hide caption

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Pan American Health Organization/Flickr

With CDC Help, Puerto Rico Aims To Get Ahead Of Zika

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Puerto Rico Waits To See If Zika Scares Off Tourists

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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Sporadic dengue fever outbreaks in Florida in 2009 and 2010 spurred mosquito control efforts in Key West and Miami Beach, shown here. The same mosquito that carries dengue, Aedes aegypti, can transmit Zika. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Governor Ramps Up Mosquito Fight To Stay Ahead Of Zika

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The Florida Supreme Court in Tallahassee, shown here in 2007, must decide whether executions can move ahead as planned. Jon V/Flickr hide caption

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Jon V/Flickr

Florida Supreme Court To Decide Whether Executions Can Go Forward

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Larvae of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured through a microscope viewfinder. The larvae will die before reaching adulthood. Nelson Almeida /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Almeida /AFP/Getty Images

Florida Researchers Complete Investigation Into Shuttered Reform School

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Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Ron Bergeron handles a snake as part of the Python Challenge in the Everglades. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Hunting Snakes In The Everglades To Protect Native Species

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Passengers travel on one of the ferries that cut across Havana Bay from Casablanca to Old Havana in July 2015. While the Obama administration has approved licenses to companies that want to offer services to Miami, the plans are still controversial on both sides. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Plan For Cuba Ferry Terminal Reveals Shift In Miami Politics

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