Greg Allen As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast.
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Scott Israel listens to comments by his attorney at a news conference in January 2019. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended Israel over his handling of last year's massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Florida Senate special master Dudley Goodlette is recommending that Israel be reinstated. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla., and other members of Congress are appealing a decision by the Department of Veterans Affairs to evict them from office spaces at VA hospitals. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Veterans Affairs Secretary Evicts Members Of Congress From Offices In VA Hospitals

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Kendieth Russell Roberts and her 5-year-old son Malachai are living with her sister in Florida. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Bahamians Who Fled Dorian Face An Uncertain Future In U.S.

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María Fernanda Papa, 16, wanted to continue the dance education she'd begun back home in Venezuela. She's now enrolled at a school run by Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida in North Miami Beach. Patricia Laine Romero/Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida hide caption

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Patricia Laine Romero/Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida

The Next Stage: How Young Venezuelan Artists Continue Their Studies In The U.S.

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Slow Moving Hurricane Dorian Batters The Bahamas

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Hurricane Dorian Still Expected To Turn North

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As part of a national plan reassessing the status of animals and plants on the endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recommended that Key deer be "delisted due to recovery." Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Trump Administration Opens Door To Dropping Florida's Key Deer From Endangered List

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Police officers talk to an employee at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, Fla., in 2017. A number of patients died after the air conditioning stopped following Hurricane Irma, authorities said. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

4 Former Staffers Face Charges Over Nursing Home Deaths After Hurricane Irma

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Suzanne Devine Clark, an art teacher at Deerfield Beach Elementary School, places painted stones at a memorial outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the first anniversary of the school shooting on Feb. 14, 2019, in Parkland, Fla. The state passed its red flag law in 2018 after the shootings at the high school. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Florida Could Serve As Example For Lawmakers Considering Red Flag Laws

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Mississippi Communities Still In Shock Following ICE Raids And Arrests

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In Florida's Lake Okeechobee, huge blooms of blue-green algae have become an annual occurrence. The Army Corps of Engineers is testing methods based on wastewater treatment to remove the green slime, which can produce toxins that threaten drinking water supplies, local economies and human health. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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A New Old Way To Combat Toxic Algae: Float It Up, Then Skim It Off

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