Greg Allen As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast.
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Greg Allen

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Greg Allen at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Greg Allen

Correspondent, Miami

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and environmental stories. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Allen was a key part of NPR's coverage of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, providing some of the first reports on the disaster. He was on the front lines of NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, arriving in New Orleans before the storm arrived and filing on the chaos and flooding that hit the city as the levees broke. Allen's reporting played an important role in NPR's coverage of the aftermath and the rebuilding of New Orleans, as well as in coverage of the BP oil spill which brought new hardships to the Gulf coast.

More recently, he played key roles in NPR's reporting in 2018 on the devastation caused on Florida's panhandle by Hurricane Michael and on the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

As NPR's only correspondent in Florida, Allen covered the dizzying boom and bust of the state's real estate market, as well as the state's important role in the 2008 and 2016 presidential elections. He's produced stories highlighting the state's unique culture and natural beauty, from Miami's Little Havana to the Everglades.

Allen has been with NPR for three decades as an editor, executive producer, and correspondent.

Before moving into reporting, Allen served as the executive producer of NPR's national daily live call-in show, Talk of the Nation. Prior to that, Allen spent a decade at NPR's Morning Edition. As editor and senior editor, he oversaw developing stories and interviews, helped shape the program's editorial direction, and supervised the program's staff.

Before coming to NPR, Allen was a reporter with NPR member station WHYY-FM in Philadelphia from 1987 to 1990. His radio career includes working an independent producer and as a reporter/producer at NPR member station WYSO-FM in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Allen graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, with a B.A. cum laude. He began his career at WXPN-FM as a student, and there he was a host and producer for a weekly folk music program that included interviews, features, and live and recorded music.

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Nestlé Faces Opposition Over Plans To Take More Water In Florida

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Despite Challenges To ACA, Florida Enrollment Rises

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Activists demonstrated recently in High Springs, Fla., to oppose Nestlé's plan to withdraw more than a million gallons of water a day from Ginnie Springs. Reagan Fink/WUFT hide caption

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The Water Is Already Low At A Florida Freshwater Spring, But Nestlé Wants More

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Brazilian peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolia, is a relative of poison ivy. It is one of the most damaging invasive weeds of agricultural and natural areas of Florida, Hawaii and Texas. Courtesy of UF/IFAS hide caption

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Courtesy of UF/IFAS

Florida Researchers Use Pests To Help Control Pesky Brazilian Peppertree Plant

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Former Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel, seen on Monday. The state Senate voted Wednesday to confirm his ouster by Gov. Ron DeSantis over the performance of his department in the 2018 high school shootings in Parkland. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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Former Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel appears before the state Senate Rules Committee concerning his dismissal by Gov. Ron DeSantis on Monday in Tallahassee, Fla. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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Panama City, Fla., Struggles To Recover A Year After Hurricane

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Voters In Florida's Swing District Weigh In On Impeachment Inquiry

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Businesses have been slow to reopen since Hurricane Michael, in part because there aren't enough workers. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Recovery Is Slow In The Florida Panhandle A Year After Hurricane Michael

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Scott Israel listens to comments by his attorney at a news conference in January 2019. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended Israel over his handling of last year's massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Florida Senate special master Dudley Goodlette is recommending that Israel be reinstated. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla., and other members of Congress are appealing a decision by the Department of Veterans Affairs to evict them from office spaces at VA hospitals. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Veterans Affairs Secretary Evicts Members Of Congress From Offices In VA Hospitals

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Kendieth Russell Roberts and her 5-year-old son Malachai are living with her sister in Florida. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Bahamians Who Fled Dorian Face An Uncertain Future In U.S.

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María Fernanda Papa, 16, wanted to continue the dance education she'd begun back home in Venezuela. She's now enrolled at a school run by Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida in North Miami Beach. Patricia Laine Romero/Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida hide caption

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Patricia Laine Romero/Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida

The Next Stage: How Young Venezuelan Artists Continue Their Studies In The U.S.

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Slow Moving Hurricane Dorian Batters The Bahamas

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