Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
Steve Barrett/N/A

Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Life Time Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos was returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a Break thru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Story Archive

Yemeni-American Fathi Alhuthaifi stands with his son Ahmed, 9. His wife has been denied a visa under the Trump administration's travel ban. Deb Amos/NPR hide caption

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Displaced Syrians, who fled their homes in the city of Deir ez-Zor, carry boxes of United Nations aid at a camp in Syria's northeastern Hassakeh province in February. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Has Accepted Only 11 Syrian Refugees This Year

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New evidence presented in a Washington, D.C., federal court claims that American journalist Marie Colvin, right, was killed in a targeted assassination by the Syrian regime in 2012. Arthur Edwards/AP hide caption

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Arthur Edwards/AP

Syrian Defector: Assad Forces Targeted, Killed Journalist Marie Colvin

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Russian Chemist Who Developed Nerve Agents Has No Doubt Moscow Is Behind U.K. Attack

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An Iranian woman prays at St. Joseph's Cathedral in Tehran, Iran, a country where Christians and other religious groups have faced persecution. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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100 Iranians Remain Stranded In Austria Awaiting Asylum In The U.S.

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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman conducts a meeting with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May with other members of their delegations, in London, on March 7. Dan Kitwood/AP hide caption

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Saudi Arabia: The White House Loves It. Most Americans? Not So Much

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Trump Administration Denies Asylum To Some 100 Iranian Christians

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U.S. Renews Temporary Protected Status For Some Syrians

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Nearly 7,000 Syrians Are Waiting To See If Their Protected Status Will Be Renewed

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Suleiman Ibrahim Osman, from Syria, sits outside his tent in the Kawergosk refugee camp in northern Iraq in April. He's one of millions of people worldwide who have recently been forced out of their homes from war. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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The Year The U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program Unraveled

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In U.N. Art Exhibition, Syrian Artist Unpacks Refugees' Baggage

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Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Appears To Be Shifting How Power Works In The Kingdom

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