Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
Stories By

Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos
Steve Barrett/N/A

Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight, and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown," and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including a duPont-Columbia Award and a Breakthru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos is a Ferris Professor at Princeton, where she teaches journalism during the fall term.

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Syrian Oscar-nominated filmmaker Feras Fayyad answers journalists' questions outside a courtroom during a break in a trial against two Syrian defendants accused of state-sponsored torture in Syria, on April 23, in Koblenz, Germany. Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Immigration Crackdowns Not Unusual During Times Of Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/881358609/881358610" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How The Pandemic Has Affected Patients In Hospice Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/869053439/869053440" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syrian War Crimes Trial Resumes In Germany

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/859991380/859991381" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York Doctor Spends Yet Another Medical Crisis In The Emergency Room

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/850964044/850964045" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a courtroom in the western German city of Koblenz, a former high-ranking Syrian intelligence officer, charged with crimes against humanity, will go to trial on Thursday. Werner Otto/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Werner Otto/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

Suspects In Syrian Crimes Against Humanity Trial Will Face Accusers In German Court

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/839010108/841925763" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Afghans, New To The U.S., Go From War Zone To COVID-19 Hot Zone

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/840717885/840717886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Asylum seekers walk along Roxham Rd. in 2017, making their way towards the U.S.-Canada border. More than 50,000 migrants have entered Canada at irregular crossings since 2017. Geoff Robins/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Geoff Robins/AFP via Getty Images

Lebanese anti-government protesters use the light on their mobile phones during a demonstration in downtown Beirut in November. Activists turned to social media platforms to get out their message, streaming protests live on Twitter and highlighting police abuse on Instagram. New podcasts documenting corruption launched with the protest movement. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

Lebanon's Government Is Accused Of Swarming WhatsApp To Catch Protesters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809684634/816658295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Civilian Casualties And Refugee Crisis Intensify As Syrian Army Moves In On Idlib

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809741300/809741301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Displaced Syrians From Idlib Province Set Up Tent Camps Near Turkey's Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/808016530/808016531" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.N. Pleads For Cease-Fire As Displaced Syrians Head For Turkish Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/807294721/807294722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With Idlib Province Under Fire, A Major Humanitarian Crisis In Syria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805396940/805397023" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript