Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight, and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown," and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including a duPont-Columbia Award and a Breakthru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos is a Ferris Professor at Princeton, where she teaches journalism during the fall term.

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Story Archive

German Chancellor Angela Merkel Brushes Off Health Concerns, Says She Is Fine

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How Instex, Europe's Trade Channel With Iran, Will Work

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An honor guard stands at the coffin of assassinated German politician Walter Lübcke at his memorial service on June 13 in Kassel, Germany. Lübcke, a Christian Democrat, was outspoken in his pro-immigration views. His confessed killer is an avowed neo-Nazi with a 20-plus-year history of violence against immigrants. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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A German Politician's Assassination Prompts New Fears About Far-Right Violence

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Fears Of Far-Right Terror In Germany

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How The International Community Is Reacting To Rising U.S.-Iran Tensions

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Europe Wants To Continue Doing Some Business With Iran Despite U.S. Sanctions

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A People's Liberation Army tank sits below a portrait of Mao Zedong at the Gate of Heavenly Peace in Beijing on June 11, 1989, one week after the crackdown on protesters at Tiananmen Square. Sadayuki Mikami/AP hide caption

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Sadayuki Mikami/AP

'Bearing Witness Is Really All We Have': Memories Of Covering The Tiananmen Aftermath

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This Nov. 30, 2014, image made from video released by Loujain Alhathloul, shows her driving in the United Arab Emirates toward the border with Saudi Arabia. Her siblings have visited the United States this week to receive an award in her honor and to raise further awareness of her case. Loujain Alhathloul/AP hide caption

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Loujain Alhathloul/AP

'Won't Give Up': Siblings Of Jailed Saudi Women's Rights Activist Speak Out In U.S.

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Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, 18, addresses the media during a news conference at a refugee resettling agency in Toronto on Jan. 15. She pledged to "work in support of freedom for women around the world, the same freedom I experienced on the first day I arrived in Canada." Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saudi Kingdom Tries To Prevent More Women From Fleeing

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Saudi King Reshuffles Cabinet After Khashoggi Kiling

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Syrian refugee women hold their children in a refugee compound in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

2018 Was A Year Of Drastic Cuts To U.S. Refugee Admissions

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As The U.S. Takes In Fewer Refugees, Its Global Role Is Changing

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