Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
Deborah Amos
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Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos
Steve Barrett/N/A

Deborah Amos

International Correspondent

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Life Time Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos was returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a Break thru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, 18, addresses the media during a news conference at a refugee resettling agency in Toronto on Jan. 15. She pledged to "work in support of freedom for women around the world, the same freedom I experienced on the first day I arrived in Canada." Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Kingdom Tries To Prevent More Women From Fleeing

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Saudi King Reshuffles Cabinet After Khashoggi Kiling

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Syrian refugee women hold their children in a refugee compound in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

2018 Was A Year Of Drastic Cuts To U.S. Refugee Admissions

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As The U.S. Takes In Fewer Refugees, Its Global Role Is Changing

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'A Private War' Celebrates The Courage Of Journalist Marie Colvin

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Killing Of Journalist Jamal Khashoggi Stirs Up Rivalries In The Middle East

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Turkish President Says Journalist Jamal Khashoggi Was 'Brutally Murdered'

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Saudi Arabians React To The Alleged Murder Of Journalist Jamal Khashoggi

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What's Really Known About Saudi Arabia's De Facto Ruler?

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Mohammad Alahmad, a Syrian academic, speaks at a New University in Exile Consortium event last week. Alahmad continued teaching at Raqqa University until ISIS shut down the school. "I decided to stay to help students," he said, "to continue teaching as much as we can." He and his family left Syria after the university was shut down. Ben Ferrari/The New School hide caption

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Ben Ferrari/The New School

15 Women Entrepreneurs From Saudi Arabia Visit U.S. To Develop Their Pitches

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Syrian lawyer Anwar al-Bunni, who survived torture in Syrian regime jail cells, is pictured in Berlin on March 1, 2017. He is among other Syrian torture survivors, lawyers and human rights groups who have filed criminal complaints in Germany alleging crimes against humanity and war crimes committed by top officials in President Bashar Assad's regime. Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Syria's War Nearly Over, Victims Take The Battle To European Courts

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