Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Deborah Amos

A protester wearing a T-shirt with the pre-Gadhafi Libyan flag takes part in a protest against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi in front of the Arab League headquarters in Cairo on March 22. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Nasser Nasser/AP

Egypt's College Campuses Rocked With Unrest

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Hass Dennoui, founder of Re-Volt Radio, a platform promoting Arab hip-hop, films a spot along a street in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Courtesy of Hass Dennoui hide caption

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Courtesy of Hass Dennoui

Staff members of Al-Jazeera prepare for a broadcast in Doha, Qatar. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

Protesters Not Satisfied With Bahrain's Concessions

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Saudis wave and cheer as the convoy of King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia passes through the streets of Riyadh on Wednesday. As the king returns from three months of medical treatments, he faces increasing demands for political reform. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Nearby Uprisings Stoke Saudis' Political Passions

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Saudis Uneasy Amid Arab Unrest

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Force Is Likely A Dated Formula Against Protesters

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Saudi students sit for their final high school exams at the end of the school year June 19 in the Red Sea port city of Jeddah. Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images

Rise Of Education Lifts Arab Youths' Expectations

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A shop in Cairo's Tahrir Square is spray-painted with the word "twitter" on Feb. 4, days after the Egyptian government blocked Internet access. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Through Protests, One Man Helps Define Twitter

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Arab Leaders Feel U.S. Abandoned Egypt's Mubarak

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Fahad Albutairi, 25, is a geologist and stand-up comedian. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR