Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Deborah Amos

A Houthi Shiite fighter stands guard as people search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa airport in Yemen on Thursday. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

Saudi Arabia, With U.S. Support, Joins Fight Against Rebels In Yemen

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App Helps Syrian Refugees Adapt To Life Away From Home

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Baghdad Dials Back Expectations For A Timeline On Mosul Offensive

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Kurdish peshmerga fighters keep watch during the battle with Islamic State militants on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 21. Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov

Under ISIS, Life In Mosul Takes A Turn For The Bleak

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Shiite fighters and Sunni fighters, who have joined Shiite militia groups known collectively as Hashid Shaabi ("Popular Mobilization") to fight the Islamic State, gesture Tuesday next to former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces in the Iraqi town of Ouja, near Tikrit. Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov

In Tikrit Offensive, Local Sunnis, Shiite Militias Are Unlikely Allies

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Arab States And Iran's Nuclear Talks

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Dura Europos, a Roman walled city in eastern Syria, dates back to 330 B.C. The main gate is shown here in a photo from 2010. It's one of the many important archaeological sites militants of the self-styled Islamic State have ransacked and damaged. EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov hide caption

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EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov

Via Satellite, Tracking The Plunder Of Middle East Cultural History

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Members of a Saudi women's soccer team, Rana Al Khateeb (left) and captain Rawh Abdullah, practice at a secret location in the capital Riyadh in 2012. Saudi women have had only rare opportunities to play sports. The country sent women to the Olympics for the first time in 2012 and now girls will be allowed to take physical education classes at public schools. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Saudi Girls Can Now Take Gym Class, But Not Everyone Is Happy

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These pop-up targets are part of an advanced drill, named "friend or foe," that tests shooter reaction times. Some targets have a camera, and others, like these pictured, have a gun. The shooter must decide within seconds whether to shoot. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

Saudi Arabia Ramps Up Training To Repel Homegrown Terrorists

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Syrian volunteers cover mosaics in the Ma'arra museum with a protective layer of glue, covered by cloth. Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project hide caption

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Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project

In Syria, Archaeologists Risk Their Lives To Protect Ancient Heritage

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Saudi women, shown here at a cultural festival near the capital Riyadh on Sunday, still need the permission of male relatives to travel and even receive certain medical procedures, but a growing number are entering the workforce. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Women Still Can't Drive, But They Are Making It To Work

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Saudi Arabia's Prince Turki al-Faisal, shown in 2013 in Bahrain, says the 'pinpricks' against the Islamic State have not been effective. The former intelligence chief also says the campaign needs to be better coordinated. Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty hide caption

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Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty

Saudis Grow Increasingly Critical Of The Campaign Against ISIS

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'Shesh Yak' Explores A Society Torn Apart By The Syrian Civil War

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Assad Says He Wants No Part Of U.S. Campaign Against ISIS

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Saudi Arabia's King Salman, who assumed the throne on Friday, is shown at the G20 conference in Brisbane, Australia, on Nov. 15, 2014, when he was the crown prince. His succession went smoothly, but the new monarch faces a region in turmoil. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

For The Saudis, A Smooth Succession At A Difficult Moment

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