Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year. Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images

Last Armenian Village In Turkey Keeps Silent About 1915 Slaughter

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Syrian children listen to a teacher during a lesson in a temporary classroom in Suruc refugee camp on March 25 in Suruc, Turkey. The camp is the largest of its kind in Turkey with a population of about 35,000 Syrians who have fled the ongoing civil war in their country. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

Turkish Educator Pledges $10M To Set Up Universities For Syrian Refugees

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A Houthi Shiite fighter stands guard as people search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa airport in Yemen on Thursday. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

Saudi Arabia, With U.S. Support, Joins Fight Against Rebels In Yemen

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Baghdad Dials Back Expectations For A Timeline On Mosul Offensive

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Kurdish peshmerga fighters keep watch during the battle with Islamic State militants on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 21. Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov

Under ISIS, Life In Mosul Takes A Turn For The Bleak

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Dura Europos, a Roman walled city in eastern Syria, dates back to 330 B.C. The main gate is shown here in a photo from 2010. It's one of the many important archaeological sites militants of the self-styled Islamic State have ransacked and damaged. EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov hide caption

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EPA /Deir Ezz-Zour Antiquities Department/Landov

Via Satellite, Tracking The Plunder Of Middle East Cultural History

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Members of a Saudi women's soccer team, Rana Al Khateeb (left) and captain Rawh Abdullah, practice at a secret location in the capital Riyadh in 2012. Saudi women have had only rare opportunities to play sports. The country sent women to the Olympics for the first time in 2012 and now girls will be allowed to take physical education classes at public schools. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Saudi Girls Can Now Take Gym Class, But Not Everyone Is Happy

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These pop-up targets are part of an advanced drill, named "friend or foe," that tests shooter reaction times. Some targets have a camera, and others, like these pictured, have a gun. The shooter must decide within seconds whether to shoot. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

Saudi Arabia Ramps Up Training To Repel Homegrown Terrorists

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Syrian volunteers cover mosaics in the Ma'arra museum with a protective layer of glue, covered by cloth. Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project hide caption

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Ma'arra Museum Project/Safeguarding the Heritage of Syria and Iraq Project

In Syria, Archaeologists Risk Their Lives To Protect Ancient Heritage

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A screen shot from Seven Quests shows a battle with the hero, Rostam, and his troops. The game is based on a 1,000-year-old Iranian poem. Courtesy of Gameguise hide caption

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Courtesy of Gameguise

Video Game Based On Ancient Story Aims For Audiences In Iran, Beyond

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Maj. Mariam Al Mansouri, the first Emirati female fighter pilot, flew in the first UAE airstrikes in the American-led campaign against ISIS. AP hide caption

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AP

United Arab Emirates Shows Off Its Military Might

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An Iraqi Christian prays inside a shrine on the grounds of the Mazar Mar Eillia Catholic Church in Irbil, in northern Iraq. Irbil has become home to hundreds of Iraqi Christians who fled their homes as the Islamic State advanced earlier this year. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

With Each New Upheaval In Iraq, More Minorities Flee

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Aid Group Uses Successful Syrian Refugee To Inspire Others In Turkish Camp

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U.S. And Turkey Discuss Strengthening Syrian Opposition

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Alleged Islamic State militants stand next to an ISIS flag atop a hill in the Syrian town of Ain al-Arab, called Kobane by the Kurds, as seen from the Turkish-Syrian border in Suruc, Turkey, on Monday. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

A Smuggler Explains How He Helped Fighters Along 'Jihadi Highway'

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