Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

A billboard in Taif, Saudi Arabia, shows King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud (center) flanked by his 31-year-old son, Mohammed bin Salman (right), and Prince Mohammed bin Nayef. The king appointed his son as his successor and first in line to the throne, stripping Nayef of the title of crown prince and ousting him from his powerful position of interior minister. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Nabil/AP

What To Know About Saudi Arabia's New Crown Prince And The Issues He Will Face

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533812179/533866210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Saudi King Names 31-Year-Old Son As New Crown Prince

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533844056/533844057" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Call-In: The Refugee Experience In The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532457897/532457898" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Hussam Jefee-Bahloul, right, reads one of his poems for Ta'sheeq, a project he founded to help Syrian poets and artists share their experiences. Artiom Maksimov/Courtesy of Ta'sheeq hide caption

toggle caption
Artiom Maksimov/Courtesy of Ta'sheeq

Archaeologists In Syria Use 'Data Water' To Confound Antiquities Smugglers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520922468/520922469" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syrian Psychiatrist In The U.S. Uses Online Platform To Help Mental Health Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519170588/519170589" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

HIAS, a Jewish group that supports refugee resettlement, held a rally against President Trump's immigration ban on Feb. 12 in New York City. The group worries that giving governors the power to veto arrivals — something President Trump wants to do that last week's court ruling did not address — could unravel the resettlement program. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

Trump Administration Considers Ways To Up Vetting Of Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513196756/513196757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters at Los Angeles International Airport rally Sunday against President Trump's executive order halting entry of refugees and others into the U.S. Amanda Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amanda Edwards/Getty Images

Trump Takes Action To Cut Flow Of Refugees Entering U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512082100/512088852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Signs Executive Action To Impose 'New Vetting Measures' For Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512047312/512047317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When the leaders of Rutland, Vt., decided to host Syrian refugees, it made them a target of a national effort to oppose refugee settlement. Nina Keck/VPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nina Keck/VPR

A Vermont Town In The Eye Of The Refugee Resettlement Storm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511283811/511851803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Employees hand-finish cheesecakes on the production line at Eli's in Chicago. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deborah Amos/NPR

Refugees Resettled In Chicago Help Make Its Most Famous Cheesecake

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506740287/507984038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Almothana Alhamoud (second from left) with his family in Chicago. From left to right are his sister, Fatina; their father, Abdel Bari; their mother, Alia; and his other sister, Rowan. Alhamoud earned a computer engineering degree in Syria, but when he came to the U.S., he initially worked as a cashier. The group Upwardly Global helped him find a job in IT. Deb Amos/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deb Amos/NPR

How One U.S. Group Turns Migrants Into Employees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507146518/507287070" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript