Deborah Amos Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.
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Deborah Amos

Lebanese President Michel Suleiman (center) receives Saudi King Abdullah (left) and Syrian President Bashar Assad upon their arrival at the Presidential Palace in Baabda, east of Beirut, on Friday. The leaders of Syria and Saudi Arabia launched an unprecedented effort Friday to defuse fears of violence over upcoming indictments in the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

Women wear the niqab, a face-covering veil, as they shop in Damascus' oldest market on Monday. The Syrian Education Ministry's ban on the veil comes as similar moves in Europe spark cries of discrimination against Muslims. Bassem Tellawi/AP hide caption

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Bassem Tellawi/AP

Iraqis follow a June 14 parliamentary session on local TV at a barbershop in Baghdad. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

Boats Head To Pick Up Stranded Teen Sailor

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Suicide Bomber Strikes Afghan Wedding

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White House Plans More Economic Stimulus

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The massive Ataturk Dam (shown here in 1992), in southeast Turkey, harnesses water for one of the biggest irrigation and electric power schemes in the world. A drought and other factors have created an acute water shortage in the Middle East, and resentment in countries downstream from Turkey is growing. Ed Kashi/Corbis hide caption

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Ed Kashi/Corbis

Tide Of Arab-Turk Tension Rises Amid Water Shortage

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